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Prosthetic overhang is the most effective way to prevent scapular conflict in a reverse total shoulder prosthesis

Lieven De Wilde UGent, Didier Poncet, BART MIDDERNACHT UGent and Anders Ekelund (2010) ACTA ORTHOPAEDICA. 81(6). p.719-726
abstract
Methods An average and a "worst case scenario" shape in A-P view in a 2-D computer model of a scapula was created, using data from 200 "normal" scapulae, so that the position of the glenoid and humeral component could be changed as well as design features such as depth of the polyethylene insert, the size of glenosphere, the position of the center of rotation, and downward glenoid inclination. The model calculated the maximum adduction (notch angle) in the scapular plane when the cup of the humeral component was in conflict with the scapula. Results A change in humeral neck shaft inclination from 155 degrees to 145 degrees gave a 10 degrees gain in notch angle. A change in cup depth from 8 mm to 5 mm gave a gain of 12 degrees. With no inferior prosthetic overhang, a lateralization of the center of rotation from 0 mm to 5 mm gained 16 degrees. With an inferior overhang of only 1 mm, no effect of lateralizing the center of rotation was noted. Downward glenoid inclination of 0 boolean OR to 10 boolean OR gained 10 degrees. A change in glenosphere radius from 18 mm to 21 mm gained 31 degrees due to the inferior overhang created by the increase in glenosphere. A prosthetic overhang to the bone from 0 mm to 5 mm gained 39 degrees. Interpretation Of all 6 solutions tested, the prosthetic overhang created the biggest gain in notch angle and this should be considered when designing the reverse arthroplasty and defining optimal surgical technique.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
CUFF, ARTHROPLASTY, MOTION, RANGE, DESIGN, HIERARCHY, REPLACEMENT, STABILITY, IMPINGEMENT, BIOMECHANICAL EVALUATION
journal title
ACTA ORTHOPAEDICA
Acta Orthop.
volume
81
issue
6
pages
719 - 726
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000284633500011
JCR category
ORTHOPEDICS
JCR impact factor
1.897 (2010)
JCR rank
22/60 (2010)
JCR quartile
2 (2010)
ISSN
1745-3674
DOI
10.3109/17453674.2010.538354
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
1094480
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1094480
date created
2011-01-05 14:04:54
date last changed
2014-01-06 12:51:40
@article{1094480,
  abstract     = {Methods An average and a {\textacutedbl}worst case scenario{\textacutedbl} shape in A-P view in a 2-D computer model of a scapula was created, using data from 200 {\textacutedbl}normal{\textacutedbl} scapulae, so that the position of the glenoid and humeral component could be changed as well as design features such as depth of the polyethylene insert, the size of glenosphere, the position of the center of rotation, and downward glenoid inclination. The model calculated the maximum adduction (notch angle) in the scapular plane when the cup of the humeral component was in conflict with the scapula.
Results A change in humeral neck shaft inclination from 155 degrees to 145 degrees gave a 10 degrees gain in notch angle. A change in cup depth from 8 mm to 5 mm gave a gain of 12 degrees. With no inferior prosthetic overhang, a lateralization of the center of rotation from 0 mm to 5 mm gained 16 degrees. With an inferior overhang of only 1 mm, no effect of lateralizing the center of rotation was noted. Downward glenoid inclination of 0 boolean OR to 10 boolean OR gained 10 degrees. A change in glenosphere radius from 18 mm to 21 mm gained 31 degrees due to the inferior overhang created by the increase in glenosphere. A prosthetic overhang to the bone from 0 mm to 5 mm gained 39 degrees.
Interpretation Of all 6 solutions tested, the prosthetic overhang created the biggest gain in notch angle and this should be considered when designing the reverse arthroplasty and defining optimal surgical technique.},
  author       = {De Wilde, Lieven and Poncet, Didier and MIDDERNACHT, BART and Ekelund, Anders},
  issn         = {1745-3674},
  journal      = {ACTA ORTHOPAEDICA},
  keyword      = {CUFF,ARTHROPLASTY,MOTION,RANGE,DESIGN,HIERARCHY,REPLACEMENT,STABILITY,IMPINGEMENT,BIOMECHANICAL EVALUATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {719--726},
  title        = {Prosthetic overhang is the most effective way to prevent scapular conflict in a reverse total shoulder prosthesis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/17453674.2010.538354},
  volume       = {81},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
De Wilde, Lieven, Didier Poncet, BART MIDDERNACHT, and Anders Ekelund. 2010. “Prosthetic Overhang Is the Most Effective Way to Prevent Scapular Conflict in a Reverse Total Shoulder Prosthesis.” Acta Orthopaedica 81 (6): 719–726.
APA
De Wilde, L., Poncet, D., MIDDERNACHT, B., & Ekelund, A. (2010). Prosthetic overhang is the most effective way to prevent scapular conflict in a reverse total shoulder prosthesis. ACTA ORTHOPAEDICA, 81(6), 719–726.
Vancouver
1.
De Wilde L, Poncet D, MIDDERNACHT B, Ekelund A. Prosthetic overhang is the most effective way to prevent scapular conflict in a reverse total shoulder prosthesis. ACTA ORTHOPAEDICA. 2010;81(6):719–26.
MLA
De Wilde, Lieven, Didier Poncet, BART MIDDERNACHT, et al. “Prosthetic Overhang Is the Most Effective Way to Prevent Scapular Conflict in a Reverse Total Shoulder Prosthesis.” ACTA ORTHOPAEDICA 81.6 (2010): 719–726. Print.