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Cell growth and morphogenesis in the desmid Micrasterias denticulata (Zygnemophyceae, Streptophyta) through transcriptomics and reverse genetics

(2010)
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Abstract
This thesis addresses a fundamental biological question: how is plant cell morphology achieved? The shape of a plant cell inherently defines its function, for both unicellular algae and cells associated in a tissue. Since the latter are difficult to examine individually, a unicellular representative was found in the streptophyte green alga Micrasterias denticulata Bréb. Being their closest unicellular relative and having a cell wall with similar constituents, Micrasterias bears close resemblance to land plants. For decades, its haploid constitution, large size and, above all, complex morphology and distinct growth mechanism have been recognized as trumps for research on spatial and temporal patterning of cell wall biogenesis. The aim of this thesis is to identify and describe molecular mechanisms governing cell pattern and cell wall formation during Micrasterias cell growth. Since this is the first molecular-genetic investigation of Micrasterias, several challenges had to be taken up. The strategy of the project is based on the cDNA-AFLP (cDNA-Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) technique (Vuylsteke et al., 2007), which allows quantitative gene expression profiling under differential cellular conditions without prior sequence knowledge. Through cDNA-AFLP analysis (new) genes involved in a particular physiological process, in casu cell growth and morphogenesis, can be identified. Knowledge about the expression of a collection of co-regulated genes, resulting from the cDNA-AFLP analysis, allows setting up hypotheses about their function. In order to be able to functionally study presumed key regulatory genes by means of reverse genetics, a genetic transformation protocol had to be established. Despite the transiency of the transformation, transgenic cell lines served subcellular localization studies of tagged proteins and/or gene overexpression phenotyping, thus providing a first step towards their functional characterization.
Keywords
RAB GTPase, pectin methylesterase, cell wall, expansin

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Citation

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Chicago
Vannerum, Katrijn. 2010. “Cell Growth and Morphogenesis in the Desmid Micrasterias Denticulata (Zygnemophyceae, Streptophyta) Through Transcriptomics and Reverse Genetics”. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences.
APA
Vannerum, K. (2010). Cell growth and morphogenesis in the desmid Micrasterias denticulata (Zygnemophyceae, Streptophyta) through transcriptomics and reverse genetics. Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences, Ghent, Belgium.
Vancouver
1.
Vannerum K. Cell growth and morphogenesis in the desmid Micrasterias denticulata (Zygnemophyceae, Streptophyta) through transcriptomics and reverse genetics. [Ghent, Belgium]: Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences; 2010.
MLA
Vannerum, Katrijn. “Cell Growth and Morphogenesis in the Desmid Micrasterias Denticulata (Zygnemophyceae, Streptophyta) Through Transcriptomics and Reverse Genetics.” 2010 : n. pag. Print.
@phdthesis{1093511,
  abstract     = {This thesis addresses a fundamental biological question: how is plant cell morphology achieved? The shape of a plant cell inherently defines its function, for both unicellular algae and cells associated in a tissue. Since the latter are difficult to examine individually, a unicellular representative was found in the streptophyte green alga Micrasterias denticulata Br{\'e}b. Being their closest unicellular relative and having a cell wall with similar constituents, Micrasterias bears close resemblance to land plants. For decades, its haploid constitution, large size and, above all, complex morphology and distinct growth mechanism have been recognized as trumps for research on spatial and temporal patterning of cell wall biogenesis.
The aim of this thesis is to identify and describe molecular mechanisms governing cell pattern and cell wall formation during Micrasterias cell growth. Since this is the first molecular-genetic investigation of Micrasterias, several challenges had to be taken up. The strategy of the project is based on the cDNA-AFLP (cDNA-Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) technique (Vuylsteke et al., 2007), which allows quantitative gene expression profiling under differential cellular conditions without prior sequence knowledge. Through cDNA-AFLP analysis (new) genes involved in a particular physiological process, in casu cell growth and morphogenesis, can be identified. Knowledge about the expression of a collection of co-regulated genes, resulting from the cDNA-AFLP analysis, allows setting up hypotheses about their function. In order to be able to functionally study presumed key regulatory genes by means of reverse genetics, a genetic transformation protocol had to be established. Despite the transiency of the transformation, transgenic cell lines served subcellular localization studies of tagged proteins and/or gene overexpression phenotyping, thus providing a first step towards their functional characterization.},
  author       = {Vannerum, Katrijn},
  keyword      = {RAB GTPase,pectin methylesterase,cell wall,expansin},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {162},
  publisher    = {Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences},
  school       = {Ghent University},
  title        = {Cell growth and morphogenesis in the desmid Micrasterias denticulata (Zygnemophyceae, Streptophyta) through transcriptomics and reverse genetics},
  year         = {2010},
}