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'Ever' and universal quantifiers of time: observations from some Germanic languages

(1996) LANGUAGE SCIENCES. 18(1-2). p.469-484
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Abstract
This paper explores similarities and differences among 'ever' words in English (ever), German (je) and Dutch (ooit) both synchronically and diachronically. The 'always' readings clearly attested for all three elements throughout the pre-modern periods of their languages seem to have involved marking them in different ways for 'PAST' and 'FUTURE' ('always was' v. 'always will be') in at least Dutch and German (ooit = 'ever'+'still'; immer = 'ever'+'more'). Later, the 'always' meaning was taken over by transparent 'all'-compounds (E. al-ways, D. al-tijd) except in German, where immer was retained and all-zeit remained marginal. The question is highlighted, and an overview of the data presented, as to why and how this subsystem of time adverbs came to be structured and re-structured in this way.

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Chicago
Leuschner, Torsten. 1996. “‘Ever’ and Universal Quantifiers of Time: Observations from Some Germanic Languages.” In Language Sciences, ed. Katarzyna Jaszczolt and Ken Turner, 18:469–484.
APA
Leuschner, T. (1996). “Ever” and universal quantifiers of time: observations from some Germanic languages. In K. Jaszczolt & K. Turner (Eds.), LANGUAGE SCIENCES (Vol. 18, pp. 469–484). Presented at the Contrastive Semantics and Pragmatics.
Vancouver
1.
Leuschner T. “Ever” and universal quantifiers of time: observations from some Germanic languages. In: Jaszczolt K, Turner K, editors. LANGUAGE SCIENCES. 1996. p. 469–84.
MLA
Leuschner, Torsten. “‘Ever’ and Universal Quantifiers of Time: Observations from Some Germanic Languages.” Language Sciences. Ed. Katarzyna Jaszczolt & Ken Turner. Vol. 18. 1996. 469–484. Print.
@inproceedings{1090922,
  abstract     = {This paper explores similarities and differences among 'ever' words in English (ever), German (je) and Dutch (ooit) both synchronically and diachronically. The 'always' readings clearly attested for all three elements throughout the pre-modern periods of their languages seem to have involved marking them in different ways for 'PAST' and 'FUTURE' ('always was' v. 'always will be') in at least Dutch and German (ooit = 'ever'+'still'; immer = 'ever'+'more'). Later, the 'always' meaning was taken over by transparent 'all'-compounds (E. al-ways, D. al-tijd) except in German, where immer was retained and all-zeit remained marginal. The question is highlighted, and an overview of the data presented, as to why and how this subsystem of time adverbs came to be structured and re-structured in this way.},
  articleno    = {29},
  author       = {Leuschner, Torsten},
  booktitle    = {LANGUAGE SCIENCES},
  editor       = {Jaszczolt , Katarzyna and Turner, Ken},
  issn         = {0388-0001},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Brighton, UK},
  number       = {1-2},
  pages        = {29:469--29:484},
  title        = {'Ever' and universal quantifiers of time: observations from some Germanic languages},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0388-0001(96)00030-7},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {1996},
}

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