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Quantitative meta-analysis on state and trait aspects of auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia

Simone Kühn UGent and Jürgen Gallinat (2012) SCHIZOPHRENIA BULLETIN. 38(4). p.779-786
abstract
Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) have a high prevalence in schizophrenic patients. An array of studies have explored the neural correlates of AVHs by means of functional neuroimaging and have associated AVHs with diverse brain regions, some of which have been shown to be involved in speech generation, speech perception, and auditory stimulus processing. We divided these studies into "state" studies comparing periods of presence and absence of AVHs within-subject and "trait" studies comparing patients experiencing AVHs with patients without AVHs or healthy controls during tasks, with verbal material. We set out to test the internal consistency and possible dissociations of the neural correlates of AVHs. We used activation likelihood estimation to perform quantitative meta-analyses on brain regions reported in state and trait studies on AVHs to assess significant concordance across studies. State studies were associated with activation in bilateral inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral postcentral gyrus, and left parietal operculum. Trait studies on the other hand showed convergence of decreases in hallucinating subjects in left superior temporal gyrus, left middle temporal gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex, and left premotor cortex activity. Based on the clear dissociation of brain regions that show convergence across state in comparison to trait studies, we conclude that the state of experiencing AVHs is primarily related brain regions that have been implicated in speech production ie, Broca's area, whereas the general trait that makes humans prone to AVHs seems to be related to brain areas involved in auditory stimuli processing and speech perception, ie, auditory cortex.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
INNER SPEECH, TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION, FUNCTIONAL-ANATOMY, AREAS, PERCEPTION, ACTIVATION, CORTEX, DYSFUNCTION, SEMANTICS, SYMPTOMS, auditory verbal hallucinations, schizophrenia, quantitative meta-analysis, STG, Broca, fMRI, PET
journal title
SCHIZOPHRENIA BULLETIN
Schizophr. Bull.
volume
38
issue
4
pages
779 - 786
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000306864500019
JCR category
PSYCHIATRY
JCR impact factor
8.486 (2012)
JCR rank
4/120 (2012)
JCR quartile
1 (2012)
ISSN
0586-7614
DOI
10.1093/schbul/sbq152
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1090339
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1090339
date created
2010-12-21 09:25:15
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:45:03
@article{1090339,
  abstract     = {Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) have a high prevalence in schizophrenic patients. An array of studies have explored the neural correlates of AVHs by means of functional neuroimaging and have associated AVHs with diverse brain regions, some of which have been shown to be involved in speech generation, speech perception, and auditory stimulus processing. We divided these studies into {\textacutedbl}state{\textacutedbl} studies comparing periods of presence and absence of AVHs within-subject and {\textacutedbl}trait{\textacutedbl} studies comparing patients experiencing AVHs with patients without AVHs or healthy controls during tasks, with verbal material. We set out to test the internal consistency and possible dissociations of the neural correlates of AVHs. We used activation likelihood estimation to perform quantitative meta-analyses on brain regions reported in state and trait studies on AVHs to assess significant concordance across studies. State studies were associated with activation in bilateral inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral postcentral gyrus, and left parietal operculum. Trait studies on the other hand showed convergence of decreases in hallucinating subjects in left superior temporal gyrus, left middle temporal gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex, and left premotor cortex activity. Based on the clear dissociation of brain regions that show convergence across state in comparison to trait studies, we conclude that the state of experiencing AVHs is primarily related brain regions that have been implicated in speech production ie, Broca's area, whereas the general trait that makes humans prone to AVHs seems to be related to brain areas involved in auditory stimuli processing and speech perception, ie, auditory cortex.},
  author       = {K{\"u}hn, Simone and Gallinat, J{\"u}rgen},
  issn         = {0586-7614},
  journal      = {SCHIZOPHRENIA BULLETIN},
  keyword      = {INNER SPEECH,TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION,FUNCTIONAL-ANATOMY,AREAS,PERCEPTION,ACTIVATION,CORTEX,DYSFUNCTION,SEMANTICS,SYMPTOMS,auditory verbal hallucinations,schizophrenia,quantitative meta-analysis,STG,Broca,fMRI,PET},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {779--786},
  title        = {Quantitative meta-analysis on state and trait aspects of auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbq152},
  volume       = {38},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Kühn, Simone, and Jürgen Gallinat. 2012. “Quantitative Meta-analysis on State and Trait Aspects of Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in Schizophrenia.” Schizophrenia Bulletin 38 (4): 779–786.
APA
Kühn, S., & Gallinat, J. (2012). Quantitative meta-analysis on state and trait aspects of auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia. SCHIZOPHRENIA BULLETIN, 38(4), 779–786.
Vancouver
1.
Kühn S, Gallinat J. Quantitative meta-analysis on state and trait aspects of auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia. SCHIZOPHRENIA BULLETIN. 2012;38(4):779–86.
MLA
Kühn, Simone, and Jürgen Gallinat. “Quantitative Meta-analysis on State and Trait Aspects of Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in Schizophrenia.” SCHIZOPHRENIA BULLETIN 38.4 (2012): 779–786. Print.