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Reduced thickness in medial orbitofrontal cortex in smokers

Simone Kühn UGent, Florian Schubert and Jürgen Gallinat (2010) BIOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY. 68(11). p.1061-1065
abstract
BACKGROUND: Structural deficiencies within the prefrontal cortex might be related to drug-taking behavior that prevails in smokers. Cortical thickness has been found to be a structural modulator of cerebral function and cognition and a subtle correlate of mental disorders. However, to date an analysis of cortical thickness in smokers compared with never-smokers has not been undertaken. METHODS: We acquired high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scans from 22 smokers and 21 never-smokers and used FreeSurfer to model the gray-white and pial surfaces for each individual cortex to compute the distance between these surfaces to obtain a measure of cortical thickness. The main cortical folds were aligned across individuals with FreeSurfer's surface-based averaging technique to compare whole brain differences in cortical thickness between smokers and never-smokers. RESULTS: Relative to never-smokers, smokers showed greater cortical thinning in the left medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC). Cortical thickness measures extracted from mOFC correlated negatively with the amount of cigarettes consumed/day and the magnitude of lifetime exposure to tobacco smoke. CONCLUSIONS: The brains of smokers are structurally different from those of never-smokers in a dose-dependent manner. The cortical thinning in mOFC in smokers relative to never-smokers might imply dysfunctions of the brain's reward, impulse control, and decision-making circuits. Related behavioral correlates are suggested to be relevant for smoking initiation and maintenance.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
VOXEL-BASED MORPHOMETRY, CEREBRAL-BLOOD-FLOW, CHRONIC CIGARETTE-SMOKING, RESTING TOBACCO SMOKERS, CORTICAL THICKNESS, DECISION-MAKING, GRAY-MATTER, ADOLESCENT SMOKERS, PREFRONTAL CORTEX, CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH, Addiction, cortical thickness, orbitofrontal cortex, smoking, nicotine, substance dependence
journal title
BIOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY
Biol. Psychiatry
volume
68
issue
11
pages
1061 - 1065
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000284834600015
JCR category
PSYCHIATRY
JCR impact factor
8.674 (2010)
JCR rank
4/126 (2010)
JCR quartile
1 (2010)
ISSN
0006-3223
DOI
10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.08.004
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1090299
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1090299
date created
2010-12-21 09:16:08
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:46:18
@article{1090299,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Structural deficiencies within the prefrontal cortex might be related to drug-taking behavior that prevails in smokers. Cortical thickness has been found to be a structural modulator of cerebral function and cognition and a subtle correlate of mental disorders. However, to date an analysis of cortical thickness in smokers compared with never-smokers has not been undertaken. METHODS: We acquired high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scans from 22 smokers and 21 never-smokers and used FreeSurfer to model the gray-white and pial surfaces for each individual cortex to compute the distance between these surfaces to obtain a measure of cortical thickness. The main cortical folds were aligned across individuals with FreeSurfer's surface-based averaging technique to compare whole brain differences in cortical thickness between smokers and never-smokers. RESULTS: Relative to never-smokers, smokers showed greater cortical thinning in the left medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC). Cortical thickness measures extracted from mOFC correlated negatively with the amount of cigarettes consumed/day and the magnitude of lifetime exposure to tobacco smoke. CONCLUSIONS: The brains of smokers are structurally different from those of never-smokers in a dose-dependent manner. The cortical thinning in mOFC in smokers relative to never-smokers might imply dysfunctions of the brain's reward, impulse control, and decision-making circuits. Related behavioral correlates are suggested to be relevant for smoking initiation and maintenance.},
  author       = {K{\"u}hn, Simone and Schubert, Florian and Gallinat, J{\"u}rgen },
  issn         = {0006-3223},
  journal      = {BIOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY},
  keyword      = {VOXEL-BASED MORPHOMETRY,CEREBRAL-BLOOD-FLOW,CHRONIC CIGARETTE-SMOKING,RESTING TOBACCO SMOKERS,CORTICAL THICKNESS,DECISION-MAKING,GRAY-MATTER,ADOLESCENT SMOKERS,PREFRONTAL CORTEX,CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH,Addiction,cortical thickness,orbitofrontal cortex,smoking,nicotine,substance dependence},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {1061--1065},
  title        = {Reduced thickness in medial orbitofrontal cortex in smokers},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.08.004},
  volume       = {68},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Kühn, Simone, Florian Schubert, and Jürgen Gallinat. 2010. “Reduced Thickness in Medial Orbitofrontal Cortex in Smokers.” Biological Psychiatry 68 (11): 1061–1065.
APA
Kühn, S., Schubert, F., & Gallinat, J. (2010). Reduced thickness in medial orbitofrontal cortex in smokers. BIOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY, 68(11), 1061–1065.
Vancouver
1.
Kühn S, Schubert F, Gallinat J. Reduced thickness in medial orbitofrontal cortex in smokers. BIOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY. 2010;68(11):1061–5.
MLA
Kühn, Simone, Florian Schubert, and Jürgen Gallinat. “Reduced Thickness in Medial Orbitofrontal Cortex in Smokers.” BIOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY 68.11 (2010): 1061–1065. Print.