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Production of conjugated linoleic acid and conjugated linolenic acid isomers by Bifidobacterium species

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Abstract
Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and conjugated linolenic acid (CLNA) isomers have attracted great interest because of their potential health benefits. Formation of CLA and CLNA takes place in the rumen during biohydrogenation. Several studies have indicated that certain types of intestinal bacteria, including bifidobacteria, are able to convert linoleic acid (LA) to CLA. The role of intestinal bacteria in the formation of CLNA isomers is largely unknown. In the present study, a screening of 36 different Bifidobacterium strains for their ability to produce CLA and CLNA from free LA and alpha-linolenic acid (LNA), respectively, was performed. The strains were grown in MRS broth, to which LA or LNA (0.5 mg ml(-1)) were added after 7 h of bacterial growth. Cultures were further incubated at 37A degrees C for 72 h. Six strains (four Bifidobacterium breve strains, a Bifidobacterium bifidum strain and a Bifidobacterium pseudolongum strain) were able to produce different CLA and CLNA isomers. Conversion percentages varied from 19.5% to 53.5% for CLA production and from 55.6% to 78.4% for CLNA production among these strains. The CLA isomers produced were further identified with Ag+-HPLC. LA was mainly converted to t9t11-CLA and c9t11-CLA. The main CLNA isomers were identified with GC-MS as c9t11c15-CLNA and t9t11c15-CLNA.
Keywords
Bifidobacteria, Conjugated fatty acid, CLA, CLNA, GC-MS, Ag+-HPLC, UNSATURATED FATTY-ACIDS, BLUE YOUNG BULLS, BUTYRIVIBRIO-FIBRISOLVENS, ANTIPROLIFERATIVE ACTIVITY, VACCENIC ACID, HUMAN HEALTH, IN-VITRO, BIOHYDROGENATION, RUMEN, MILK

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Chicago
Gorissen, Lara, Katleen Raes, Stefan Wecks, Dirk Dannenberg, Frederic Leroy, Luc De Vuyst, and Stefaan De Smet. 2010. “Production of Conjugated Linoleic Acid and Conjugated Linolenic Acid Isomers by Bifidobacterium Species.” Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology 87 (6): 2257–2266.
APA
Gorissen, L., Raes, K., Wecks, S., Dannenberg, D., Leroy, F., De Vuyst, L., & De Smet, S. (2010). Production of conjugated linoleic acid and conjugated linolenic acid isomers by Bifidobacterium species. APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY, 87(6), 2257–2266.
Vancouver
1.
Gorissen L, Raes K, Wecks S, Dannenberg D, Leroy F, De Vuyst L, et al. Production of conjugated linoleic acid and conjugated linolenic acid isomers by Bifidobacterium species. APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY. 2010;87(6):2257–66.
MLA
Gorissen, Lara, Katleen Raes, Stefan Wecks, et al. “Production of Conjugated Linoleic Acid and Conjugated Linolenic Acid Isomers by Bifidobacterium Species.” APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY 87.6 (2010): 2257–2266. Print.
@article{1083141,
  abstract     = {Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and conjugated linolenic acid (CLNA) isomers have attracted great interest because of their potential health benefits. Formation of CLA and CLNA takes place in the rumen during biohydrogenation. Several studies have indicated that certain types of intestinal bacteria, including bifidobacteria, are able to convert linoleic acid (LA) to CLA. The role of intestinal bacteria in the formation of CLNA isomers is largely unknown. In the present study, a screening of 36 different Bifidobacterium strains for their ability to produce CLA and CLNA from free LA and alpha-linolenic acid (LNA), respectively, was performed. The strains were grown in MRS broth, to which LA or LNA (0.5 mg ml(-1)) were added after 7 h of bacterial growth. Cultures were further incubated at 37A degrees C for 72 h. Six strains (four Bifidobacterium breve strains, a Bifidobacterium bifidum strain and a Bifidobacterium pseudolongum strain) were able to produce different CLA and CLNA isomers. Conversion percentages varied from 19.5% to 53.5% for CLA production and from 55.6% to 78.4% for CLNA production among these strains. The CLA isomers produced were further identified with Ag+-HPLC. LA was mainly converted to t9t11-CLA and c9t11-CLA. The main CLNA isomers were identified with GC-MS as c9t11c15-CLNA and t9t11c15-CLNA.},
  author       = {Gorissen, Lara and Raes, Katleen and Wecks, Stefan and Dannenberg, Dirk and Leroy, Frederic and De Vuyst, Luc and De Smet, Stefaan},
  issn         = {0175-7598},
  journal      = {APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY},
  keywords     = {Bifidobacteria,Conjugated fatty acid,CLA,CLNA,GC-MS,Ag+-HPLC,UNSATURATED FATTY-ACIDS,BLUE YOUNG BULLS,BUTYRIVIBRIO-FIBRISOLVENS,ANTIPROLIFERATIVE ACTIVITY,VACCENIC ACID,HUMAN HEALTH,IN-VITRO,BIOHYDROGENATION,RUMEN,MILK},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {2257--2266},
  title        = {Production of conjugated linoleic acid and conjugated linolenic acid isomers by Bifidobacterium species},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-010-2713-1},
  volume       = {87},
  year         = {2010},
}

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