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Shanjo and Fwe as part of Bantu Botatwe: a diachronic phonological approach

Koen Bostoen UGent (2009) Selected proceedings of the 39th Annual Conference on African Linguistics : Linguistic Research and Languages in Africa. p.110-130
abstract
This paper is a comparative study of diachronic sound change in Shanjo and Fwe, two poorly described Bantu languages spoken in the southern part of the Western Province of Zambia. This application of the comparative method aims at defining their historical position within the Bantu Botatwe languages and, by extension, at illuminating the internal subgrouping of this language group. Shanjo and Fwe turn out to belong to the western branch, which is in many respects phonologically more conservative than the eastern branch.
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author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
in
Selected proceedings of the 39th Annual Conference on African Linguistics : Linguistic Research and Languages in Africa
editor
Akinloye Ojo and Lioba Moshi
pages
110 - 130
publisher
Cascadilla Press
place of publication
Sommerville, MA, USA
conference name
39th Annual Conference on African Linguistics : Linguistic Research and Languages in Africa
conference location
Athens, GA, USA
conference start
2008-04-17
conference end
2008-04-20
ISBN
9781574734317
language
English
UGent publication?
no
classification
C1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
1081912
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1081912
date created
2010-12-03 13:53:32
date last changed
2017-01-02 09:52:41
@inproceedings{1081912,
  abstract     = {This paper is a comparative study of diachronic sound change in Shanjo and Fwe, two poorly described Bantu languages spoken in the southern part of the Western Province of Zambia. This application of the comparative method aims at defining their historical position within the Bantu Botatwe languages and, by extension, at illuminating the internal subgrouping of this language group. Shanjo and Fwe turn out to belong to the western branch, which is in many respects phonologically more conservative than the eastern branch.},
  author       = {Bostoen, Koen},
  booktitle    = {Selected proceedings of the 39th Annual Conference on African Linguistics : Linguistic Research and Languages in Africa},
  editor       = {Ojo, Akinloye  and Moshi, Lioba},
  isbn         = {9781574734317},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Athens, GA, USA},
  pages        = {110--130},
  publisher    = {Cascadilla Press},
  title        = {Shanjo and Fwe as part of Bantu Botatwe: a diachronic phonological approach},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Bostoen, Koen. 2009. “Shanjo and Fwe as Part of Bantu Botatwe: a Diachronic Phonological Approach.” In Selected Proceedings of the 39th Annual Conference on African Linguistics : Linguistic Research and Languages in Africa, ed. Akinloye Ojo and Lioba Moshi, 110–130. Sommerville, MA, USA: Cascadilla Press.
APA
Bostoen, K. (2009). Shanjo and Fwe as part of Bantu Botatwe: a diachronic phonological approach. In A. Ojo & L. Moshi (Eds.), Selected proceedings of the 39th Annual Conference on African Linguistics : Linguistic Research and Languages in Africa (pp. 110–130). Presented at the 39th Annual Conference on African Linguistics : Linguistic Research and Languages in Africa, Sommerville, MA, USA: Cascadilla Press.
Vancouver
1.
Bostoen K. Shanjo and Fwe as part of Bantu Botatwe: a diachronic phonological approach. In: Ojo A, Moshi L, editors. Selected proceedings of the 39th Annual Conference on African Linguistics : Linguistic Research and Languages in Africa. Sommerville, MA, USA: Cascadilla Press; 2009. p. 110–30.
MLA
Bostoen, Koen. “Shanjo and Fwe as Part of Bantu Botatwe: a Diachronic Phonological Approach.” Selected Proceedings of the 39th Annual Conference on African Linguistics : Linguistic Research and Languages in Africa. Ed. Akinloye Ojo & Lioba Moshi. Sommerville, MA, USA: Cascadilla Press, 2009. 110–130. Print.