Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Coffee waste as an alternative fertilizer with soil improving properties for sandy soils in humid tropical environments

Ruben Koy Kasongo UGent, Ann Verdoodt UGent, P Kanyankagote, Geert Baert UGent and Eric Van Ranst UGent (2011) SOIL USE AND MANAGEMENT. 27(1). p.94-102
abstract
Arenosols cover extensive areas in coffee producing, humid tropical countries of Sub-Sahara Africa (Angola, DR Congo) and Southern America (Brazil). A laboratory experiment was undertaken to examine the potential of using coffee waste to improve the physico-chemical properties of an Arenosol from DR Congo. The amendment was applied at three rates to the topsoil and incubated in soil columns at field moisture capacity for 24 months. A control without any amendment was integral to the completely randomized experimental design involving three replicates. The soil columns were watered weekly with an amount of distilled water approximating to 87% of the average rainfall. Every 3 months, the soil chemical properties and the fraction of leached water and cations were measured. All application rates raised soil pH above 5.5 within 3 months. Exchangeable Ca, Mg and K showed respectively, 5 to 7-, 2 to 3- and 7 to 14-fold increases with increasing application rates. Organic C and total N significantly increased within 6 months to ca. 1.5 and 0.12% respectively, inducing a decrease in the C/N ratio from 17 to 13. The combined action of increasing soil pH and organic C contributed to a significant increase in cation exchange capacity. Increases in available P were significant, but temporary, with maximum values attained at 9 months. Coffee waste application significantly increased the fraction of retained soil water from 53% to 60%. It promoted the retention of basic cations, immobilized Mn, but increased the mobility of Fe. Coffee waste has the potential to be used as a liming material, an NPK fertilizer and has the benefits also of increasing water and nutrient retention.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
soil chemical fertility, Sandy soils, DR Congo, CHEMICAL-PROPERTIES, ACIDITY, water and nutrient retention, industrial waste, ORGANIC-MATTER, CHICKEN MANURE, AMENDMENTS, PLANTATION, CHEMISTRY, ADDITIONS, SORPTION, ULTISOL
journal title
SOIL USE AND MANAGEMENT
Soil Use Manage.
volume
27
issue
1
pages
94 - 102
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000287483300012
JCR category
SOIL SCIENCE
JCR impact factor
1.608 (2011)
JCR rank
14/32 (2011)
JCR quartile
2 (2011)
ISSN
0266-0032
DOI
10.1111/j.1475-2743.2010.00315.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1080506
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1080506
date created
2010-11-29 15:31:49
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:44:31
@article{1080506,
  abstract     = {Arenosols cover extensive areas in coffee producing, humid tropical countries of Sub-Sahara Africa (Angola, DR Congo) and Southern America (Brazil). A laboratory experiment was undertaken to examine the potential of using coffee waste to improve the physico-chemical properties of an Arenosol from DR Congo. The amendment was applied at three rates to the topsoil and incubated in soil columns at field moisture capacity for 24 months. A control without any amendment was integral to the completely randomized experimental design involving three replicates. The soil columns were watered weekly with an amount of distilled water approximating to 87\% of the average rainfall. Every 3 months, the soil chemical properties and the fraction of leached water and cations were measured. All application rates raised soil pH above 5.5 within 3 months. Exchangeable Ca, Mg and K showed respectively, 5 to 7-, 2 to 3- and 7 to 14-fold increases with increasing application rates. Organic C and total N significantly increased within 6 months to ca. 1.5 and 0.12\% respectively, inducing a decrease in the C/N ratio from 17 to 13. The combined action of increasing soil pH and organic C contributed to a significant increase in cation exchange capacity. Increases in available P were significant, but temporary, with maximum values attained at 9 months. Coffee waste application significantly increased the fraction of retained soil water from 53\% to 60\%. It promoted the retention of basic cations, immobilized Mn, but increased the mobility of Fe. Coffee waste has the potential to be used as a liming material, an NPK fertilizer and has the benefits also of increasing water and nutrient retention.},
  author       = {Koy Kasongo, Ruben and Verdoodt, Ann and Kanyankagote, P and Baert, Geert and Van Ranst, Eric},
  issn         = {0266-0032},
  journal      = {SOIL USE AND MANAGEMENT},
  keyword      = {soil chemical fertility,Sandy soils,DR Congo,CHEMICAL-PROPERTIES,ACIDITY,water and nutrient retention,industrial waste,ORGANIC-MATTER,CHICKEN MANURE,AMENDMENTS,PLANTATION,CHEMISTRY,ADDITIONS,SORPTION,ULTISOL},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {94--102},
  title        = {Coffee waste as an alternative fertilizer with soil improving properties for sandy soils in humid tropical environments},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1475-2743.2010.00315.x},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Koy Kasongo, Ruben, Ann Verdoodt, P Kanyankagote, Geert Baert, and Eric Van Ranst. 2011. “Coffee Waste as an Alternative Fertilizer with Soil Improving Properties for Sandy Soils in Humid Tropical Environments.” Soil Use and Management 27 (1): 94–102.
APA
Koy Kasongo, R., Verdoodt, A., Kanyankagote, P., Baert, G., & Van Ranst, E. (2011). Coffee waste as an alternative fertilizer with soil improving properties for sandy soils in humid tropical environments. SOIL USE AND MANAGEMENT, 27(1), 94–102.
Vancouver
1.
Koy Kasongo R, Verdoodt A, Kanyankagote P, Baert G, Van Ranst E. Coffee waste as an alternative fertilizer with soil improving properties for sandy soils in humid tropical environments. SOIL USE AND MANAGEMENT. 2011;27(1):94–102.
MLA
Koy Kasongo, Ruben, Ann Verdoodt, P Kanyankagote, et al. “Coffee Waste as an Alternative Fertilizer with Soil Improving Properties for Sandy Soils in Humid Tropical Environments.” SOIL USE AND MANAGEMENT 27.1 (2011): 94–102. Print.