Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Wound reaction after bark harvesting: microscopic and macroscopic phenomena in ten medicinal tree species (Benin)

Claire Delvaux UGent, Brice Sinsin, Patrick Van Damme UGent and Hans Beeckman (2010) TREES-STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION. 24(5). p.941-951
abstract
In Africa, little is known about how the vascular anatomy of medicinal tree species is influenced by bark harvesting, and the ability of species to react against debarking needs to be better understood. This study aims to evaluate the temporal and spatial impact of bark harvesting on wood anatomy and to determine the extent to which a tree's ability to close the wound after bark harvesting is affected by anatomical changes in the wood. We harvested bark from ten medicinal tree species located in an Isoberlinia doka woodland in Central Benin. Two years after debarking, the wound closure was measured and one tree per species was cut at the wound level to collect a stem disc. On the cross section of each disc, vessel features (area, density and specific conductive area) were measured in the radial direction (before and after wounding) and on three locations around the disc surface. We found that during early wound healing, all species produced vessels with a smaller area than in unaffected wood and this significantly decreased the specific conductive area in eight of the investigated species. However, after 2 years, only six trees had restored their specific conductive area. In addition, a significant positive correlation (r = 0.64, P < 0.005) confirmed the relationship between the specific conductive area and tissue production to close the wound and delineated the study group into two groups of trees. Therefore, we concluded that vessels appeared to be very good anatomical indicators of the tree's reactions to debarking.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Specific conductive area, Bark harvesting, Re-growth dynamics, Vessel features, Wood anatomy, VESSEL SIZE, VASCULAR DIFFERENTIATION, HYDRAULIC ARCHITECTURE, SECONDARY XYLEM, REGENERATION, POPLAR, BETULA, CONDUCTIVITY, PARENCHYMA, EFFICIENCY
journal title
TREES-STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION
Trees-Struct. Funct.
volume
24
issue
5
pages
941 - 951
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000281794300015
JCR category
FORESTRY
JCR impact factor
1.444 (2010)
JCR rank
13/53 (2010)
JCR quartile
1 (2010)
ISSN
0931-1890
DOI
10.1007/s00468-010-0465-2
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1078489
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1078489
date created
2010-11-23 11:56:39
date last changed
2010-11-23 16:14:37
@article{1078489,
  abstract     = {In Africa, little is known about how the vascular anatomy of medicinal tree species is influenced by bark harvesting, and the ability of species to react against debarking needs to be better understood. This study aims to evaluate the temporal and spatial impact of bark harvesting on wood anatomy and to determine the extent to which a tree's ability to close the wound after bark harvesting is affected by anatomical changes in the wood. We harvested bark from ten medicinal tree species located in an Isoberlinia doka woodland in Central Benin. Two years after debarking, the wound closure was measured and one tree per species was cut at the wound level to collect a stem disc. On the cross section of each disc, vessel features (area, density and specific conductive area) were measured in the radial direction (before and after wounding) and on three locations around the disc surface. We found that during early wound healing, all species produced vessels with a smaller area than in unaffected wood and this significantly decreased the specific conductive area in eight of the investigated species. However, after 2 years, only six trees had restored their specific conductive area. In addition, a significant positive correlation (r = 0.64, P {\textlangle} 0.005) confirmed the relationship between the specific conductive area and tissue production to close the wound and delineated the study group into two groups of trees. Therefore, we concluded that vessels appeared to be very good anatomical indicators of the tree's reactions to debarking.},
  author       = {Delvaux, Claire and Sinsin, Brice and Van Damme, Patrick and Beeckman, Hans},
  issn         = {0931-1890},
  journal      = {TREES-STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION},
  keyword      = {Specific conductive area,Bark harvesting,Re-growth dynamics,Vessel features,Wood anatomy,VESSEL SIZE,VASCULAR DIFFERENTIATION,HYDRAULIC ARCHITECTURE,SECONDARY XYLEM,REGENERATION,POPLAR,BETULA,CONDUCTIVITY,PARENCHYMA,EFFICIENCY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {941--951},
  title        = {Wound reaction after bark harvesting: microscopic and macroscopic phenomena in ten medicinal tree species (Benin)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00468-010-0465-2},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Delvaux, Claire, Brice Sinsin, Patrick Van Damme, and Hans Beeckman. 2010. “Wound Reaction After Bark Harvesting: Microscopic and Macroscopic Phenomena in Ten Medicinal Tree Species (Benin).” Trees-structure and Function 24 (5): 941–951.
APA
Delvaux, C., Sinsin, B., Van Damme, P., & Beeckman, H. (2010). Wound reaction after bark harvesting: microscopic and macroscopic phenomena in ten medicinal tree species (Benin). TREES-STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION, 24(5), 941–951.
Vancouver
1.
Delvaux C, Sinsin B, Van Damme P, Beeckman H. Wound reaction after bark harvesting: microscopic and macroscopic phenomena in ten medicinal tree species (Benin). TREES-STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION. 2010;24(5):941–51.
MLA
Delvaux, Claire, Brice Sinsin, Patrick Van Damme, et al. “Wound Reaction After Bark Harvesting: Microscopic and Macroscopic Phenomena in Ten Medicinal Tree Species (Benin).” TREES-STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION 24.5 (2010): 941–951. Print.