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Tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) parkland mycorrhizal potential within three agro-ecological zones of Senegal

(2010) FRUITS. 65(6). p.377-385
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Abstract
Introduction. Tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) belongs to the Fabaceae family; it is a multipurpose tree with slow growth. In order to help improve its growth and development, we assessed mycorrhizal diversity of tamarind parklands in Senegal. Materials and methods. Three sites of tamarind populations were sampled for each agro-ecological zone in Senegal: the Sahelian zone (i), Sahelo-Sudan zone (ii) and Sudan zone (iii). Soil and root samples were collected in each site and used for arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) spore isolation and root colonization assessment. We identified the mycorrhizal fungi from spore collections and evaluated the root mycorrhization rate, defined as percentage of roots colonized according to agro-ecological zones. Results and discussion. The results did not reveal a specific AM fungal strain associated with tamarind plants. Three arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) were identified from spores on the genus level: Glomus, Scutellospora and Acaulospora. Tamarind sites with sandy soil texture (70-90%) and located in dry areas (Sahel and Sudano-Sahel zones) were shown to be rich in mycorrhizal propagules. High densities of soil AM propagules evaluated with the Most Probable Number method (MPN) were found in Niokhoul (1100 propagules per 50 g of soil), Sakal (790 propagules per 50 g of soil) and Mbassis (780 propagules per 50 g of soil). However, higher mycorrhizal colonization (11%) was observed in the Sahel agro-ecological zone compared with the Sudano-Sahelian and Sahelian zones (3%) of Senegal. Conclusion. Our study explored natural AMF diversity as a starting point to develop inocula to be used in commercial nursery production of tamarinds.
Keywords
Senegal, Tamarindus indica, arbuscular mycorrhizae, fungal, symbiosis, AREAS, CLASSIFICATION, INFECTION, TREE, SOIL, spores, biodiversity, VESICULAR-ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL, FUNGI, DIVERSITY

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Chicago
Bourou, Sali, Fatimata Ndiaye, Macoumba Diouf, Tahir Diop, and Patrick Van Damme. 2010. “Tamarind (Tamarindus Indica L.) Parkland Mycorrhizal Potential Within Three Agro-ecological Zones of Senegal.” Fruits 65 (6): 377–385.
APA
Bourou, S., Ndiaye, F., Diouf, M., Diop, T., & Van Damme, P. (2010). Tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) parkland mycorrhizal potential within three agro-ecological zones of Senegal. FRUITS, 65(6), 377–385.
Vancouver
1.
Bourou S, Ndiaye F, Diouf M, Diop T, Van Damme P. Tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) parkland mycorrhizal potential within three agro-ecological zones of Senegal. FRUITS. 2010;65(6):377–85.
MLA
Bourou, Sali, Fatimata Ndiaye, Macoumba Diouf, et al. “Tamarind (Tamarindus Indica L.) Parkland Mycorrhizal Potential Within Three Agro-ecological Zones of Senegal.” FRUITS 65.6 (2010): 377–385. Print.
@article{1078482,
  abstract     = {Introduction. Tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) belongs to the Fabaceae family; it is a multipurpose tree with slow growth. In order to help improve its growth and development, we assessed mycorrhizal diversity of tamarind parklands in Senegal. Materials and methods. Three sites of tamarind populations were sampled for each agro-ecological zone in Senegal: the Sahelian zone (i), Sahelo-Sudan zone (ii) and Sudan zone (iii). Soil and root samples were collected in each site and used for arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) spore isolation and root colonization assessment. We identified the mycorrhizal fungi from spore collections and evaluated the root mycorrhization rate, defined as percentage of roots colonized according to agro-ecological zones. Results and discussion. The results did not reveal a specific AM fungal strain associated with tamarind plants. Three arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) were identified from spores on the genus level: Glomus, Scutellospora and Acaulospora. Tamarind sites with sandy soil texture (70-90\%) and located in dry areas (Sahel and Sudano-Sahel zones) were shown to be rich in mycorrhizal propagules. High densities of soil AM propagules evaluated with the Most Probable Number method (MPN) were found in Niokhoul (1100 propagules per 50 g of soil), Sakal (790 propagules per 50 g of soil) and Mbassis (780 propagules per 50 g of soil). However, higher mycorrhizal colonization (11\%) was observed in the Sahel agro-ecological zone compared with the Sudano-Sahelian and Sahelian zones (3\%) of Senegal. Conclusion. Our study explored natural AMF diversity as a starting point to develop inocula to be used in commercial nursery production of tamarinds.},
  author       = {Bourou, Sali and Ndiaye, Fatimata and Diouf, Macoumba and Diop, Tahir and Van Damme, Patrick},
  issn         = {0248-1294},
  journal      = {FRUITS},
  keyword      = {Senegal,Tamarindus indica,arbuscular mycorrhizae,fungal,symbiosis,AREAS,CLASSIFICATION,INFECTION,TREE,SOIL,spores,biodiversity,VESICULAR-ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL,FUNGI,DIVERSITY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {377--385},
  title        = {Tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) parkland mycorrhizal potential within three agro-ecological zones of Senegal},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/fruits/2010032},
  volume       = {65},
  year         = {2010},
}

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