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Early trajectories of spontaneous vegetation recovery after intensive agricultural land use

Lander Baeten UGent, Darline Velghe UGent, Margot Vanhellemont UGent, Pieter De Frenne UGent, Martin Hermy UGent and Kris Verheyen UGent (2010) RESTORATION ECOLOGY. 18(Suppl. 2). p.379-386
abstract
The early phases of plant colonization after the abandonment of agricultural land are a crucial starting point for a suite of successional mechanisms such as priority effects, facilitation and inhibition. Therefore, the first years of vegetation development substantially shape the trajectory of future vegetation recovery on former agricultural sites. Studies describing the abandonment of traditional, extensive agriculture are numerous, but what about intensively cultivated sites? This study covers the vegetation development in 47 plots in former maize fields in an intensive agricultural landscape in Belgium (Western Europe); fields were abandoned in 2001, 2002 and 2003. The woody canopy and the herbaceous understorey were recorded in 2006 (and in 2003 for the 2001 fields). The additional environmental variables measured were plot distance to seed trees and forest edges, soil nutrients and soil pH. The colonization success of woody species in terms of abundance and species composition was highly variable between years, and presence-absence was hard to explain. However, the growth of the most abundant species (Salix caprea agg.) was positively related to a soil nutrient gradient. Whether or not a woody canopy did establish successfully was related to alternative trajectories of herbaceous vegetation development. Under a sparse canopy of woody species, fast-growing, opportunistic species became dominant. A denser canopy favoured a higher percentage of bare ground, which may have offered suitable sites for the recruitment of additional shrub and tree species. Apparently, strong agricultural legacies can be both beneficial and detrimental to vegetation recovery following abandonment.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
COLONIZATION, GROWTH, SOIL-NUTRIENT, PLANT-COMMUNITIES, FOREST BIODIVERSITY, HERBACEOUS VEGETATION, LIMITATION, COMPETITION, DISPERSAL, DIVERSITY, altered soil properties, land abandonment, old fields, secondary succession, vegetation recovery, woody species colonization
journal title
RESTORATION ECOLOGY
Restor. Ecol.
volume
18
issue
Suppl. 2
pages
379 - 386
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000286146100015
JCR category
ECOLOGY
JCR impact factor
1.927 (2010)
JCR rank
58/129 (2010)
JCR quartile
2 (2010)
ISSN
1061-2971
DOI
10.1111/j.1526-100X.2009.00627.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1075715
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1075715
date created
2010-11-17 10:46:22
date last changed
2011-07-12 11:03:49
@article{1075715,
  abstract     = {The early phases of plant colonization after the abandonment of agricultural land are a crucial starting point for a suite of successional mechanisms such as priority effects, facilitation and inhibition. Therefore, the first years of vegetation development substantially shape the trajectory of future vegetation recovery on former agricultural sites. Studies describing the abandonment of traditional, extensive agriculture are numerous, but what about intensively cultivated sites? This study covers the vegetation development in 47 plots in former maize fields in an intensive agricultural landscape in Belgium (Western Europe); fields were abandoned in 2001, 2002 and 2003. The woody canopy and the herbaceous understorey were recorded in 2006 (and in 2003 for the 2001 fields). The additional environmental variables measured were plot distance to seed trees and forest edges, soil nutrients and soil pH. The colonization success of woody species in terms of abundance and species composition was highly variable between years, and presence-absence was hard to explain. However, the growth of the most abundant species (Salix caprea agg.) was positively related to a soil nutrient gradient. Whether or not a woody canopy did establish successfully was related to alternative trajectories of herbaceous vegetation development. Under a sparse canopy of woody species, fast-growing, opportunistic species became dominant. A denser canopy favoured a higher percentage of bare ground, which may have offered suitable sites for the recruitment of additional shrub and tree species. Apparently, strong agricultural legacies can be both beneficial and detrimental to vegetation recovery following abandonment.},
  author       = {Baeten, Lander and Velghe, Darline and Vanhellemont, Margot and De Frenne, Pieter and Hermy, Martin and Verheyen, Kris},
  issn         = {1061-2971},
  journal      = {RESTORATION ECOLOGY},
  keyword      = {COLONIZATION,GROWTH,SOIL-NUTRIENT,PLANT-COMMUNITIES,FOREST BIODIVERSITY,HERBACEOUS VEGETATION,LIMITATION,COMPETITION,DISPERSAL,DIVERSITY,altered soil properties,land abandonment,old fields,secondary succession,vegetation recovery,woody species colonization},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {Suppl. 2},
  pages        = {379--386},
  title        = {Early trajectories of spontaneous vegetation recovery after intensive agricultural land use},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1526-100X.2009.00627.x},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Baeten, Lander, Darline Velghe, Margot Vanhellemont, Pieter De Frenne, Martin Hermy, and Kris Verheyen. 2010. “Early Trajectories of Spontaneous Vegetation Recovery After Intensive Agricultural Land Use.” Restoration Ecology 18 (Suppl. 2): 379–386.
APA
Baeten, L., Velghe, D., Vanhellemont, M., De Frenne, P., Hermy, M., & Verheyen, K. (2010). Early trajectories of spontaneous vegetation recovery after intensive agricultural land use. RESTORATION ECOLOGY, 18(Suppl. 2), 379–386.
Vancouver
1.
Baeten L, Velghe D, Vanhellemont M, De Frenne P, Hermy M, Verheyen K. Early trajectories of spontaneous vegetation recovery after intensive agricultural land use. RESTORATION ECOLOGY. 2010;18(Suppl. 2):379–86.
MLA
Baeten, Lander, Darline Velghe, Margot Vanhellemont, et al. “Early Trajectories of Spontaneous Vegetation Recovery After Intensive Agricultural Land Use.” RESTORATION ECOLOGY 18.Suppl. 2 (2010): 379–386. Print.