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Travel energy consumption and the built environment: evidence from Flanders

Kobe Boussauw (UGent) and Frank Witlox (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
This paper examines the relationship between energy consumption, daily travel distance and spatial characteristics in Flanders (and partly also in Brussels), in the north of Belgium. Important regional variations in commute-energy consumption are noticed, which are related to the spatial-economic structure including aspects of population density and spatial proximity. It is found that mode choice appears to be of little impact for the energy performance of home-to-work travel at the scale of the Flanders region, while proximity between home and work locations is paramount. At the other hand, when assessing overall daily travel patterns including non-work travel, variables based on the spatial distribution of jobs do not show significant effects on the travel distance. This finding qualifies the limited importance of the commute: today, mainly non-professional travel is growing. It can be concluded that residential density and land use mix in urban areas is the best guarantee for curbing excessive mobility.
Keywords
travel behaviour, sustainable spatial development, energy performance, Flanders

Citation

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Chicago
Boussauw, Kobe, and Frank Witlox. 2010. “Travel Energy Consumption and the Built Environment: Evidence from Flanders.” In Conférence Permanente Du Développement Territorial, Colloque International, Comptes Rendus, 65–77. Conférence Permanente du Développement Territorial (CPDT).
APA
Boussauw, K., & Witlox, F. (2010). Travel energy consumption and the built environment: evidence from Flanders. Conférence Permanente du Développement Territorial, Colloque international, Comptes rendus (pp. 65–77). Presented at the Colloque international de la Conférence Permanente du Développement Territorial 2010, Conférence Permanente du Développement Territorial (CPDT).
Vancouver
1.
Boussauw K, Witlox F. Travel energy consumption and the built environment: evidence from Flanders. Conférence Permanente du Développement Territorial, Colloque international, Comptes rendus. Conférence Permanente du Développement Territorial (CPDT); 2010. p. 65–77.
MLA
Boussauw, Kobe, and Frank Witlox. “Travel Energy Consumption and the Built Environment: Evidence from Flanders.” Conférence Permanente Du Développement Territorial, Colloque International, Comptes Rendus. Conférence Permanente du Développement Territorial (CPDT), 2010. 65–77. Print.
@inproceedings{1072655,
  abstract     = {This paper examines the relationship between energy consumption, daily travel distance and spatial characteristics in Flanders (and partly also in Brussels), in the north of Belgium. Important regional variations in commute-energy consumption are noticed, which are related to the spatial-economic structure including aspects of population density and spatial proximity. It is found that mode choice appears to be of little impact for the energy performance of home-to-work travel at the scale of the Flanders region, while proximity between home and work locations is paramount. At the other hand, when assessing overall daily travel patterns including non-work travel, variables based on the spatial distribution of jobs do not show significant effects on the travel distance. This finding qualifies the limited importance of the commute: today, mainly non-professional travel is growing. It can be concluded that residential density and land use mix in urban areas is the best guarantee for curbing excessive mobility.},
  author       = {Boussauw, Kobe and Witlox, Frank},
  booktitle    = {Conf{\'e}rence Permanente du D{\'e}veloppement Territorial, Colloque international, Comptes rendus},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Li{\`e}ge, Belgium},
  pages        = {65--77},
  publisher    = {Conf{\'e}rence Permanente du D{\'e}veloppement Territorial (CPDT)},
  title        = {Travel energy consumption and the built environment: evidence from Flanders},
  year         = {2010},
}