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Validation of the Chlamydia trachomatis genital challenge pig model for testing recombinant protein vaccines

Katelijn Schautteet UGent, Edith Stuyven UGent, Eric Cox UGent and Daisy Vanrompay UGent (2011) JOURNAL OF MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY. 60(1). p.117-127
abstract
Chlamydia trachomatis is a Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen that is the leading cause of bacterial sexually transmitted disease in humans in developing countries. A vaccination programme is considered to be the best approach to reduce the prevalence of C. trachomatis infections. However, there are still no commercial C. trachomatis vaccines. In order to develop effective C. trachomatis vaccines, it is important to identify those antigens that elicit a protective immune response, and to develop new and adequate methods and adjuvants for effective vaccine delivery, as conventional methods have failed to induce protective immunity. In order to test different vaccine candidates, animal models are needed. Former studies have used non-primate monkeys, mice or guinea pig infection models. The present study used a pig model for testing recombinant protein vaccines. Two recombinant proteins, polymorphic membrane protein G (PmpG), and secretion and cellular translocation protein C (SctC), were tested for their ability to create protection in a pig C. trachomatis challenge model. The vaccines were administered subcutaneously with GNE adjuvant. Six weeks later, animals were challenged intravaginally with C. trachomatis serovar E. After a further 4 weeks, the pigs were euthanized. PmpG-immunized pigs were better protected than pigs immunized with the less promising SctC candidate vaccine antigen. Interestingly, significant protection was apparently not correlated with a strong humoral immune response upon subcutaneous immunization. In conclusion, the pig model is useful for studying the efficacy of vaccine candidates against genital human C. trachomatis infection.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
PELVIC INFLAMMATORY DISEASE, OBLIGATE INTRACELLULAR PATHOGEN, III SECRETION SYSTEM, MEMBRANE-PROTEIN, MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODIES, ANIMAL-MODELS, MURINE MODEL, INFECTION, PURIFICATION, PSITTACI
journal title
JOURNAL OF MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY
J. Med. Microbiol.
volume
60
issue
1
pages
117 - 127
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000286351700016
JCR category
MICROBIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
2.502 (2011)
JCR rank
54/111 (2011)
JCR quartile
2 (2011)
ISSN
0022-2615
DOI
10.1099/jmm.0.024448-0
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1072509
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1072509
date created
2010-11-09 17:27:23
date last changed
2012-05-02 15:15:28
@article{1072509,
  abstract     = {Chlamydia trachomatis is a Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen that is the leading cause of bacterial sexually transmitted disease in humans in developing countries. A vaccination programme is considered to be the best approach to reduce the prevalence of C. trachomatis infections. However, there are still no commercial C. trachomatis vaccines. In order to develop effective C. trachomatis vaccines, it is important to identify those antigens that elicit a protective immune response, and to develop new and adequate methods and adjuvants for effective vaccine delivery, as conventional methods have failed to induce protective immunity. In order to test different vaccine candidates, animal models are needed. Former studies have used non-primate monkeys, mice or guinea pig infection models. The present study used a pig model for testing recombinant protein vaccines. Two recombinant proteins, polymorphic membrane protein G (PmpG), and secretion and cellular translocation protein C (SctC), were tested for their ability to create protection in a pig C. trachomatis challenge model. The vaccines were administered subcutaneously with GNE adjuvant. Six weeks later, animals were challenged intravaginally with C. trachomatis serovar E. After a further 4 weeks, the pigs were euthanized. PmpG-immunized pigs were better protected than pigs immunized with the less promising SctC candidate vaccine antigen. Interestingly, significant protection was apparently not correlated with a strong humoral immune response upon subcutaneous immunization. In conclusion, the pig model is useful for studying the efficacy of vaccine candidates against genital human C. trachomatis infection.},
  author       = {Schautteet, Katelijn and Stuyven, Edith and Cox, Eric and Vanrompay, Daisy},
  issn         = {0022-2615},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {PELVIC INFLAMMATORY DISEASE,OBLIGATE INTRACELLULAR PATHOGEN,III SECRETION SYSTEM,MEMBRANE-PROTEIN,MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODIES,ANIMAL-MODELS,MURINE MODEL,INFECTION,PURIFICATION,PSITTACI},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {117--127},
  title        = {Validation of the Chlamydia trachomatis genital challenge pig model for testing recombinant protein vaccines},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/jmm.0.024448-0},
  volume       = {60},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Schautteet, Katelijn, Edith Stuyven, Eric Cox, and Daisy Vanrompay. 2011. “Validation of the Chlamydia Trachomatis Genital Challenge Pig Model for Testing Recombinant Protein Vaccines.” Journal of Medical Microbiology 60 (1): 117–127.
APA
Schautteet, K., Stuyven, E., Cox, E., & Vanrompay, D. (2011). Validation of the Chlamydia trachomatis genital challenge pig model for testing recombinant protein vaccines. JOURNAL OF MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY, 60(1), 117–127.
Vancouver
1.
Schautteet K, Stuyven E, Cox E, Vanrompay D. Validation of the Chlamydia trachomatis genital challenge pig model for testing recombinant protein vaccines. JOURNAL OF MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY. 2011;60(1):117–27.
MLA
Schautteet, Katelijn, Edith Stuyven, Eric Cox, et al. “Validation of the Chlamydia Trachomatis Genital Challenge Pig Model for Testing Recombinant Protein Vaccines.” JOURNAL OF MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY 60.1 (2011): 117–127. Print.