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Chlamydia suis, an emerging Chlamydiaceae species in pigs?

Katelijn Schautteet UGent, Cora Miry, Frederic Vangroenweghe, Patrick Delava, Evelien De Clercq UGent, Yannick Jönsson, Delphine Sylvie Anne Beeckman UGent and Daisy Vanrompay UGent (2010) Flemish Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics, 18th Annual meeting, Abstracts. p.83-83
abstract
Chlamydiaceae are Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria that can infect a broad range of animals and humans. Chlamydial infection of livestock, companion animals, and other animals may result in conjunctivitis, enteritis, pneumonia, abortion, rhinitis or arthritis but there is also a high incidence of apparently asymptomatic infections. Pigs can become infected by Chlamydophila pecorum, Chlamydophila abortus, Chlamydophila psittaci and Chlamydia suis (Everett et al., 1999). Chlamydial infections are nearly endemic in the Belgian pig population as 96% of the examined sera reacted positive in a recombinant major outer membrane protein (MOMP) antigen-based ELISA (Vanrompay et al., 2004). The purpose of this study was to examine the current serological status of our pig herd and to identify the chlamydial species involved in infecting Belgian pigs. At present, 193 (97%) of 200 examined farms tested positive for Chlamydiaceae-specific antibodies. We tried to identify the Chlamydiaceae species using a diagnostic platform comprising of culture, a Chlamydiaceae-species specific microarray and a PCR for the detection of the Chlamydia suis tetracyclin resistant gene tet(C). Our results were in accordance with the serological results, as Chlamydiaceae, and especially C. suis was highly prevalent in slaughtered pigs, in pigs ending up in the autopsy room of the Provincial Laboratory for the Prevention of Animals Diseases and in four different farms dealing with reproductive disorders. Furthermore, we could demonstrate C. suis in the eyes, the respiratory, the intestinal and the reproductive tract of sows and in semen samples of boars. We found no other species, with the exception of one Cp. pecorum and one Cp. abortus strain. In the present study, we demonstrated emerging tet(C) positive C. suis strains among Chlamydiaceae infections in pigs. Moreover, C. suis, for which Koch’s postulates have already been fulfilled in the past, are widespread in pigs throughout the world. Research towards the development of preventive measurements like probiotics (Pollmann et al., 2005) or vaccines should be promoted. In the future, the spread of tetracyclin resistant C. suis strains, for instance through international trading of boar sperm, should be carefully monitored as this may present a treat to human health.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
in
Flemish Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics, 18th Annual meeting, Abstracts
pages
83 - 83
publisher
Vlaamse Vereniging voor Veterinaire Epidemiologie en Economie (VEE)
conference name
18th Annual meeting of the Flemish Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics : Eradication of endemic animal diseases : how far do we go?
conference location
Roeselare, Belgium
conference start
2010-10-22
conference end
2010-10-22
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C3
additional info
uploaded document is poster version
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
1072475
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1072475
date created
2010-11-09 17:02:37
date last changed
2010-11-10 10:33:31
@inproceedings{1072475,
  abstract     = {Chlamydiaceae are Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria that can infect a broad range of animals and humans. Chlamydial infection of livestock, companion animals, and other animals may result in conjunctivitis, enteritis, pneumonia, abortion, rhinitis or arthritis but there is also a high incidence of apparently asymptomatic infections. Pigs can become infected by Chlamydophila pecorum, Chlamydophila abortus, Chlamydophila psittaci and Chlamydia suis (Everett et al., 1999). Chlamydial infections are nearly endemic in the Belgian pig population as 96\% of the examined sera reacted positive in a recombinant major outer membrane protein (MOMP) antigen-based ELISA (Vanrompay et al., 2004). 
The purpose of this study was to examine the current serological status of our pig herd and to identify the chlamydial species involved in infecting Belgian pigs. 
At present, 193 (97\%) of 200 examined farms tested positive for Chlamydiaceae-specific antibodies. We tried to identify the Chlamydiaceae species using a diagnostic platform comprising of culture, a Chlamydiaceae-species specific microarray and a PCR for the detection of the Chlamydia suis tetracyclin resistant gene tet(C). Our results were in accordance with the serological results, as Chlamydiaceae, and especially C. suis was highly prevalent in slaughtered pigs, in pigs ending up in the autopsy room of the Provincial Laboratory for the Prevention of Animals Diseases and in four different farms dealing with reproductive disorders. Furthermore, we could demonstrate C. suis in the eyes, the respiratory, the intestinal and the reproductive tract of sows and in semen samples of boars. We found no other species, with the exception of one Cp. pecorum and one Cp. abortus strain. In the present study, we demonstrated emerging tet(C) positive C. suis strains among Chlamydiaceae infections in pigs. Moreover, C. suis, for which Koch{\textquoteright}s postulates have already been fulfilled in the past, are widespread in pigs throughout the world. Research towards the development of preventive measurements like probiotics (Pollmann et al., 2005) or vaccines should be promoted. In the future, the spread of tetracyclin resistant C. suis strains, for instance through international trading of boar sperm, should be carefully monitored as this may present a treat to human health.},
  author       = {Schautteet, Katelijn and Miry, Cora and Vangroenweghe, Frederic  and  Delava, Patrick and De Clercq, Evelien and J{\"o}nsson, Yannick and Beeckman, Delphine Sylvie Anne and Vanrompay, Daisy},
  booktitle    = {Flemish Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics, 18th Annual meeting, Abstracts},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Roeselare, Belgium},
  pages        = {83--83},
  publisher    = {Vlaamse Vereniging voor Veterinaire Epidemiologie en Economie (VEE)},
  title        = {Chlamydia suis, an emerging Chlamydiaceae species in pigs?},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Schautteet, Katelijn, Cora Miry, Frederic Vangroenweghe, Patrick Delava, Evelien De Clercq, Yannick Jönsson, Delphine Sylvie Anne Beeckman, and Daisy Vanrompay. 2010. “Chlamydia Suis, an Emerging Chlamydiaceae Species in Pigs?” In Flemish Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics, 18th Annual Meeting, Abstracts, 83–83. Vlaamse Vereniging voor Veterinaire Epidemiologie en Economie (VEE).
APA
Schautteet, K., Miry, C., Vangroenweghe, F., Delava, P., De Clercq, E., Jönsson, Y., Beeckman, D. S. A., et al. (2010). Chlamydia suis, an emerging Chlamydiaceae species in pigs? Flemish Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics, 18th Annual meeting, Abstracts (pp. 83–83). Presented at the 18th Annual meeting of the Flemish Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics : Eradication of endemic animal diseases : how far do we go?, Vlaamse Vereniging voor Veterinaire Epidemiologie en Economie (VEE).
Vancouver
1.
Schautteet K, Miry C, Vangroenweghe F, Delava P, De Clercq E, Jönsson Y, et al. Chlamydia suis, an emerging Chlamydiaceae species in pigs? Flemish Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics, 18th Annual meeting, Abstracts. Vlaamse Vereniging voor Veterinaire Epidemiologie en Economie (VEE); 2010. p. 83–83.
MLA
Schautteet, Katelijn, Cora Miry, Frederic Vangroenweghe, et al. “Chlamydia Suis, an Emerging Chlamydiaceae Species in Pigs?” Flemish Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics, 18th Annual Meeting, Abstracts. Vlaamse Vereniging voor Veterinaire Epidemiologie en Economie (VEE), 2010. 83–83. Print.