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Methods for updating the drainage class map in Flanders, Belgium

Johan Van de Wauw and Peter Finke UGent (2010) Proceedings of the 19th World congress of Soil Science : Soil solutions for a changing world, working group 1.3 : digital soil assessment. p.35-37
abstract
Phreatic groundwater dynamics are one of the most important land characteristics for agriculture, nature development and other land uses. In Belgium, these dynamics are usually estimated from the natural drainage classes, indicated on the Belgian soil map. This information is however partly outdated, due to human intervention (artificial drainage, levelling, groundwater extraction) and –possibly- climate change. Moreover, these morphological classes were not based on actual groundwater measurements. Two groups of methods to update the old map using measured groundwater levels were applied at two locations in Flanders. A first group are 'relabeling' methods. These methods preserve the spatial structure of the old map, but assign new classes to it based on the new groundwater level observations. A second method 'remapping' uses areawide high-resolution digital auxiliary information to remap the area and create new mapping boundaries. These methods were applied to two different locations in Flanders: the valley of river Dijle (800 ha, south of Leuven) and an area close to the village of Kluizen (300 ha, east of Ghent). Validation shows that remapping provides better results than relabeling methods, although both groups of methods improve the quality of the original map.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
keyword
uncertainty, water tables, Digital soil mapping
in
Proceedings of the 19th World congress of Soil Science : Soil solutions for a changing world, working group 1.3 : digital soil assessment
editor
RJ Gilkes and N Prakongkep
article number
1803
pages
35 - 37
publisher
International Union of Soil Sciences (IUSS)
conference name
19th World congress of Soil Science : Soil solutions for a changing world
conference location
Brisbane, Australia
conference start
2010-08-01
conference end
2010-08-06
ISBN
9780646537832
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C1
additional info
published on DVD
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1069644
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1069644
alternative location
http://www.iuss.org/19th%20WCSS/symposium/pdf/1803.pdf
date created
2010-11-03 15:44:03
date last changed
2016-12-21 15:40:49
@inproceedings{1069644,
  abstract     = {Phreatic groundwater dynamics are one of the most important land characteristics for agriculture, nature development and other land uses. In Belgium, these dynamics are usually estimated from the natural drainage classes, indicated on the Belgian soil map. This information is however partly outdated, due to human intervention (artificial drainage, levelling, groundwater extraction) and --possibly- climate change. Moreover, these morphological classes were not based on actual groundwater measurements. Two groups of methods to update the old map using measured groundwater levels were applied at two locations in Flanders. A first group are 'relabeling' methods. These methods preserve the spatial structure of the old map, but assign new classes to it based on the new groundwater level observations. A second method 'remapping' uses areawide high-resolution digital auxiliary information to remap the area and create new mapping boundaries. These methods were applied to two different locations in Flanders: the valley of river Dijle (800 ha, south of Leuven) and an area close to the village of Kluizen (300 ha, east of Ghent). Validation shows that remapping provides better results than relabeling methods, although both groups of methods improve the quality of the original map.},
  articleno    = {1803},
  author       = {Van de Wauw, Johan and Finke, Peter},
  booktitle    = {Proceedings of the 19th World congress of Soil Science : Soil solutions for a changing world, working group 1.3 : digital soil assessment},
  editor       = {Gilkes, RJ and Prakongkep , N},
  isbn         = {9780646537832},
  keyword      = {uncertainty,water tables,Digital soil mapping},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Brisbane, Australia},
  pages        = {1803:35--1803:37},
  publisher    = {International Union of Soil Sciences (IUSS)},
  title        = {Methods for updating the drainage class map in Flanders, Belgium},
  url          = {http://www.iuss.org/19th\%20WCSS/symposium/pdf/1803.pdf},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Van de Wauw, Johan, and Peter Finke. 2010. “Methods for Updating the Drainage Class Map in Flanders, Belgium.” In Proceedings of the 19th World Congress of Soil Science : Soil Solutions for a Changing World, Working Group 1.3 : Digital Soil Assessment, ed. RJ Gilkes and N Prakongkep , 35–37. International Union of Soil Sciences (IUSS).
APA
Van de Wauw, J., & Finke, P. (2010). Methods for updating the drainage class map in Flanders, Belgium. In R. Gilkes & N. Prakongkep (Eds.), Proceedings of the 19th World congress of Soil Science : Soil solutions for a changing world, working group 1.3 : digital soil assessment (pp. 35–37). Presented at the 19th World congress of Soil Science : Soil solutions for a changing world, International Union of Soil Sciences (IUSS).
Vancouver
1.
Van de Wauw J, Finke P. Methods for updating the drainage class map in Flanders, Belgium. In: Gilkes R, Prakongkep N, editors. Proceedings of the 19th World congress of Soil Science : Soil solutions for a changing world, working group 1.3 : digital soil assessment. International Union of Soil Sciences (IUSS); 2010. p. 35–7.
MLA
Van de Wauw, Johan, and Peter Finke. “Methods for Updating the Drainage Class Map in Flanders, Belgium.” Proceedings of the 19th World Congress of Soil Science : Soil Solutions for a Changing World, Working Group 1.3 : Digital Soil Assessment. Ed. RJ Gilkes & N Prakongkep . International Union of Soil Sciences (IUSS), 2010. 35–37. Print.