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Pulmonary function in children after surgical and percutaneous closure of atrial septal defect

Mahmoud Zaqout (UGent) , Frans De Baets (UGent) , Petra Schelstraete (UGent) , Bert Suys, Joseph Panzer (UGent) , Katrien Francois (UGent) , Thierry Bové (UGent) , Ilse Coomans (UGent) and Daniël De Wolf (UGent)
(2010) PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY. 31(8). p.1171-1175
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Abstract
This study aimed to study differences in lung function after surgical and percutaneous atrial septal defect (ASD) closure. Several studies have demonstrated abnormalities of pulmonary function in adults and children with ASD. These abnormalities persist even a few years after correction. This study compared pulmonary function between patients who underwent ASD closure by surgery and those who had closure by device. This is the ideal pediatric population for studying changes in lung function caused by cardiopulmonary bypass or sternotomy. The 46 patients in this study were treated by percutaneous closure (group 1) or surgical closure (group 2) of ASD and then scheduled for pulmonary function testing an average of 5.8 years after ASD closure. The mean values of functional residual capacity, total lung capacity, and residual volume did not differ between the two groups. The surgical group showed a significant decrease in expiratory reserve volume (p < 0.04) and forced vital capacity (p < 0.03). Expiratory flow at 25, 50, and 75% of forced vital capacity did not differ between the two groups but was on the lower limit of normal in both groups. Percutaneous closure of ASD can minimize the side effects of surgical closure on lung function. Longitudinal lung function follow-up assessment after cardiac surgery is warranted to detect and measure restrictive abnormalities in this type of congenital heart disease and others.
Keywords
INFANTS, ADULT PATIENTS, REPAIR, CARDIAC-SURGERY, CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS, RESPIRATORY MECHANICS, LUNG-FUNCTION, TO-RIGHT SHUNTS, CONGENITAL HEART-DISEASE, Lung function test, Surgery and intervention, Atrial septal defect, Children, AEROBIC CAPACITY

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Citation

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Chicago
Zaqout, Mahmoud, Frans De Baets, Petra Schelstraete, Bert Suys, Joseph Panzer, Katrien Francois, Thierry Bové, Ilse Coomans, and Daniël De Wolf. 2010. “Pulmonary Function in Children After Surgical and Percutaneous Closure of Atrial Septal Defect.” Pediatric Cardiology 31 (8): 1171–1175.
APA
Zaqout, M., De Baets, F., Schelstraete, P., Suys, B., Panzer, J., Francois, K., Bové, T., et al. (2010). Pulmonary function in children after surgical and percutaneous closure of atrial septal defect. PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY, 31(8), 1171–1175.
Vancouver
1.
Zaqout M, De Baets F, Schelstraete P, Suys B, Panzer J, Francois K, et al. Pulmonary function in children after surgical and percutaneous closure of atrial septal defect. PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY. 2010;31(8):1171–5.
MLA
Zaqout, Mahmoud, Frans De Baets, Petra Schelstraete, et al. “Pulmonary Function in Children After Surgical and Percutaneous Closure of Atrial Septal Defect.” PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY 31.8 (2010): 1171–1175. Print.
@article{1069408,
  abstract     = {This study aimed to study differences in lung function after surgical and percutaneous atrial septal defect (ASD) closure. Several studies have demonstrated abnormalities of pulmonary function in adults and children with ASD. These abnormalities persist even a few years after correction. This study compared pulmonary function between patients who underwent ASD closure by surgery and those who had closure by device. This is the ideal pediatric population for studying changes in lung function caused by cardiopulmonary bypass or sternotomy. The 46 patients in this study were treated by percutaneous closure (group 1) or surgical closure (group 2) of ASD and then scheduled for pulmonary function testing an average of 5.8 years after ASD closure. The mean values of functional residual capacity, total lung capacity, and residual volume did not differ between the two groups. The surgical group showed a significant decrease in expiratory reserve volume (p {\textlangle} 0.04) and forced vital capacity (p {\textlangle} 0.03). Expiratory flow at 25, 50, and 75\% of forced vital capacity did not differ between the two groups but was on the lower limit of normal in both groups. Percutaneous closure of ASD can minimize the side effects of surgical closure on lung function. Longitudinal lung function follow-up assessment after cardiac surgery is warranted to detect and measure restrictive abnormalities in this type of congenital heart disease and others.},
  author       = {Zaqout, Mahmoud and De Baets, Frans and Schelstraete, Petra and Suys, Bert and Panzer, Joseph and Francois, Katrien and Bov{\'e}, Thierry and Coomans, Ilse and De Wolf, Dani{\"e}l},
  issn         = {0172-0643},
  journal      = {PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {INFANTS,ADULT PATIENTS,REPAIR,CARDIAC-SURGERY,CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS,RESPIRATORY MECHANICS,LUNG-FUNCTION,TO-RIGHT SHUNTS,CONGENITAL HEART-DISEASE,Lung function test,Surgery and intervention,Atrial septal defect,Children,AEROBIC CAPACITY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {1171--1175},
  title        = {Pulmonary function in children after surgical and percutaneous closure of atrial septal defect},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00246-010-9778-6},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2010},
}

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