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Episcopal succession in Constantinople (381-450 C.E.): the local dynamics of power

Peter Van Nuffelen UGent (2010) JOURNAL OF EARLY CHRISTIAN STUDIES. 18(3). p.425-451
abstract
Research on episcopal succession has tended to focus on the social background of bishops, the role played by individual charisma, and church canons governing elections. Such studies have identified regional differences, especially between the eastern and the western parts of the Roman Empire. Through a comparison of three communities in Theodosian Constantinople (Novatians, Eunomians, and Nicenes), this paper argues that succession patterns also reflect the sociological structure of each community and the local balance of power, two factors that are shown to be closely interlocked. Especially the role of the local church establishment, which attempts to keep control over succession against imperial intervention and popular opinion, is shown to be vital. The form this establishment takes depends on the specific social and political situation each community finds itself in, as well as its theological views. Such a local perspective is an important corrective to generalizations about episcopal successions in late antiquity.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
journal title
JOURNAL OF EARLY CHRISTIAN STUDIES
volume
18
issue
3
pages
425 - 451
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000281923200004
ISSN
1067-6341
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1068297
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1068297
date created
2010-10-29 14:25:35
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:44:33
@article{1068297,
  abstract     = {Research on episcopal succession has tended to focus on the social background of bishops, the role played by individual charisma, and church canons governing elections. Such studies have identified regional differences, especially between the eastern and the western parts of the Roman Empire. Through a comparison of three communities in Theodosian Constantinople (Novatians, Eunomians, and Nicenes), this paper argues that succession patterns also reflect the sociological structure of each community and the local balance of power, two factors that are shown to be closely interlocked. Especially the role of the local church establishment, which attempts to keep control over succession against imperial intervention and popular opinion, is shown to be vital. The form this establishment takes depends on the specific social and political situation each community finds itself in, as well as its theological views. Such a local perspective is an important corrective to generalizations about episcopal successions in late antiquity.},
  author       = {Van Nuffelen, Peter},
  issn         = {1067-6341},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF EARLY CHRISTIAN STUDIES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {425--451},
  title        = {Episcopal succession in Constantinople (381-450 C.E.): the local dynamics of power},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Van Nuffelen, Peter. 2010. “Episcopal Succession in Constantinople (381-450 C.E.): The Local Dynamics of Power.” Journal of Early Christian Studies 18 (3): 425–451.
APA
Van Nuffelen, P. (2010). Episcopal succession in Constantinople (381-450 C.E.): the local dynamics of power. JOURNAL OF EARLY CHRISTIAN STUDIES, 18(3), 425–451.
Vancouver
1.
Van Nuffelen P. Episcopal succession in Constantinople (381-450 C.E.): the local dynamics of power. JOURNAL OF EARLY CHRISTIAN STUDIES. 2010;18(3):425–51.
MLA
Van Nuffelen, Peter. “Episcopal Succession in Constantinople (381-450 C.E.): The Local Dynamics of Power.” JOURNAL OF EARLY CHRISTIAN STUDIES 18.3 (2010): 425–451. Print.