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A buried past: the tomb inscription (muzhiming) and official biographies of Wang Chuzhi (863–923)

Angela Schottenhammer UGent (2009) JOURNAL OF THE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE ORIENT. 52. p.14-56
abstract
The present article investigates the tomb inscription of Wang Chuzhi (863-923), a military governor whose career spanned the end of the Tang and the beginning of the Five Dynasties. By comparing the inscription with representations of the deceased in official sources, the article reveals that the tomb inscription presents a critical attitude toward the moral standards of conventional historiography, and demonstrates a shifting moral geography in the works of Song historians. This new standard increasingly excluded nomadic peoples from the newly imagined political body, and excluded with them the pragmatic diplomacy that had characterized the politics of the Five Dynasties.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Wang Chuzhi, tomb inscriptions, historiography, dynastic histories, Five Dynasties
journal title
JOURNAL OF THE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE ORIENT
volume
52
pages
14 - 56
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000264671000003
JCR category
HISTORY
JCR impact factor
0.029 (2009)
JCR rank
30/31 (2009)
JCR quartile
4 (2009)
ISSN
0022-4995
DOI
10.1163/156852009X405339
language
English
UGent publication?
no
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1062886
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1062886
date created
2010-10-24 16:07:06
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:46:43
@article{1062886,
  abstract     = {The present article investigates the tomb inscription of Wang Chuzhi (863-923), a military governor whose career spanned the end of the Tang and the beginning of the Five Dynasties. By comparing the inscription with representations of the deceased in official sources, the article reveals that the tomb inscription presents a critical attitude toward the moral standards of conventional historiography, and demonstrates a shifting moral geography in the works of Song historians. This new standard increasingly excluded nomadic peoples from the newly imagined political body, and excluded with them the pragmatic diplomacy that had characterized the politics of the Five Dynasties.},
  author       = {Schottenhammer, Angela},
  issn         = {0022-4995},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF THE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE ORIENT},
  keyword      = {Wang Chuzhi,tomb inscriptions,historiography,dynastic histories,Five Dynasties},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {14--56},
  title        = {A buried past: the tomb inscription (muzhiming) and official biographies of Wang Chuzhi (863--923)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/156852009X405339},
  volume       = {52},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Schottenhammer, Angela. 2009. “A Buried Past: The Tomb Inscription (muzhiming) and Official Biographies of Wang Chuzhi (863–923).” Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient 52: 14–56.
APA
Schottenhammer, Angela. (2009). A buried past: the tomb inscription (muzhiming) and official biographies of Wang Chuzhi (863–923). JOURNAL OF THE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE ORIENT, 52, 14–56.
Vancouver
1.
Schottenhammer A. A buried past: the tomb inscription (muzhiming) and official biographies of Wang Chuzhi (863–923). JOURNAL OF THE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE ORIENT. 2009;52:14–56.
MLA
Schottenhammer, Angela. “A Buried Past: The Tomb Inscription (muzhiming) and Official Biographies of Wang Chuzhi (863–923).” JOURNAL OF THE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE ORIENT 52 (2009): 14–56. Print.