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The impact of the bass drum on body movement in spontaneous dance

Edith Van Dyck (UGent) , Dirk Moelants (UGent) , Michiel Demey (UGent) , Pieter Coussement (UGent) , Alexander Deweppe (UGent) and Marc Leman (UGent)
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Abstract
When dancing at parties or in clubs, people usually synchronize with the beat of the music. But other properties of the music also have an effect on the style and intensity of their movement. One musical element that takes a prominent position in current dance music is the bass drum. In the study presented here, the effect of the dynamics of the bass drum on a dancing audience is explored. A club-like environment was constructed and 100 adolescent and adult subjects (50 male and 50 female) were asked to dance in groups of five to a 10 minute and 30 second musical mix consisting of six songs, three bass drum solo parts and some transitional material. Each song consisted of one section that was repeated three times, with a different dynamic level of the bass drum. The methodology was based on motion capture and motion sensing technology. The motion sensing acceleration data of the hips was collected, while a motion tracking system monitored head movement. The research demonstrated that the dynamic change of the bass drum does have an important effect on the intensity of movement while dancing. It seems a phenomenon that occurs commonly unnoticed by dancers. These results show that the increasing role of the bass drum in contemporary dance music is not just a stylistic element, but indeed has a positive effect on the amount of movement made by the dancers.

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Chicago
Van Dyck, Edith, Dirk Moelants, Michiel Demey, Pieter Coussement, Alexander Deweppe, and Marc Leman. 2010. “The Impact of the Bass Drum on Body Movement in Spontaneous Dance.” In Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition (ICMPC 11), ed. SM Demorest, SJ Morrison, and PS Campbell, 429–434. Seattle, WA, USA: University of Washington.
APA
Van Dyck, E., Moelants, D., Demey, M., Coussement, P., Deweppe, A., & Leman, M. (2010). The impact of the bass drum on body movement in spontaneous dance. In S. Demorest, S. Morrison, & P. Campbell (Eds.), Proceedings of the 11th international conference on music perception and cognition (ICMPC 11) (pp. 429–434). Presented at the 11th International conference on Music Perception and Cognition (ICMPC 11), Seattle, WA, USA: University of Washington.
Vancouver
1.
Van Dyck E, Moelants D, Demey M, Coussement P, Deweppe A, Leman M. The impact of the bass drum on body movement in spontaneous dance. In: Demorest S, Morrison S, Campbell P, editors. Proceedings of the 11th international conference on music perception and cognition (ICMPC 11). Seattle, WA, USA: University of Washington; 2010. p. 429–34.
MLA
Van Dyck, Edith, Dirk Moelants, Michiel Demey, et al. “The Impact of the Bass Drum on Body Movement in Spontaneous Dance.” Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition (ICMPC 11). Ed. SM Demorest, SJ Morrison, & PS Campbell. Seattle, WA, USA: University of Washington, 2010. 429–434. Print.
@inproceedings{1060508,
  abstract     = {When dancing at parties or in clubs, people usually synchronize with the beat of the music. But other properties of the music also have an effect on the style and intensity of their movement. One musical element that takes a prominent position in current dance music is the bass drum. In the study presented here, the effect of the dynamics of the bass drum on a dancing audience is explored. A club-like environment was constructed and 100 adolescent and adult subjects (50 male and 50 female) were asked to dance in groups of five to a 10 minute and 30 second musical mix consisting of six songs, three bass drum solo parts and some transitional material. Each song consisted of one section that was repeated three times, with a different dynamic level of the bass drum. The methodology was based on motion capture and motion sensing technology. The motion sensing acceleration data of the hips was collected, while a motion tracking system monitored head movement. The research demonstrated that the dynamic change of the bass drum does have an important effect on the intensity of movement while dancing. It seems a phenomenon that occurs commonly unnoticed by dancers. These results show that the increasing role of the bass drum in contemporary dance music is not just a stylistic element, but indeed has a positive effect on the amount of movement made by the dancers.},
  author       = {Van Dyck, Edith and Moelants, Dirk and Demey, Michiel and Coussement, Pieter and Deweppe, Alexander and Leman, Marc},
  booktitle    = {Proceedings of the 11th international conference on music perception and cognition (ICMPC 11)},
  editor       = {Demorest, SM and Morrison, SJ and Campbell, PS},
  isbn         = {9781876346621},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Seattle, WA, USA},
  pages        = {429--434},
  publisher    = {University of Washington},
  title        = {The impact of the bass drum on body movement in spontaneous dance},
  year         = {2010},
}