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Urinary creatinine as a biomarker in nutritional and epidemiological studies

(2010) PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION. 13(9a). p.?-?
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Abstract
Background: Acquiring accurate dietary information is a common problem in nutritional and epidemiological research. To evaluate the validity of dietary assessment methods, biomarkers from 24h urine collections are commonly used. However, obtaining complete collections is a prerequisite for this approach. Aim: To assess the performance of urinary creatinine as a biomarker for identification of incomplete 24h urine collections. Methods: Data was taken from the EFCOVAL project in which 2 non-consecutive 24h urine collections were obtained from 600 subjects (age: 45-65 y) in 5 European countries. Completeness was verified by the ratio of observed to expected creatinine excretion and compared to the recovery of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA). Cut-offs under which collections were considered incomplete were 0.7 for creatinine and 85% for PABA. Performance was assessed by calculation of sensitivity and specificity. Results: 580 duplicate urine collections were available. For the first and second collection, respectively 7.0% and 11.1% in males (ns) and 7.5% and 14.7% in females (P<0.01), were identified as incomplete by PABA. Sensitivity and specificity of urinary creatinine in males was 0.30 and 0.94 for the first, and 0.22 and 0.99 for the second collection. In females, sensitivity and specificity was 0.64 and 0.79 for the first, and 0.53 and 0.81 for the second collection. For both collections, the percentage misclassification was higher in women compared to men (10.4% and 9.4% for men, 21.8% and 22.9% for women). Conclusion: Compared to PABA, urinary creatinine has a low sensitivity for identifying incomplete 24h urine collections in European adults. Therefore, careful interpretation is warranted when used in nutritional and epidemiological research. Acknowledgement: The EFCOVAL project is supported by the EC (FP6). This abstract reflects only the author’s views and the Community is not liable for any use that may be made of the information contained therein.

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Chicago
De Keyzer, Willem, Inge Huybrechts, Sandra Crispim, Anouk Geelen, Arnold Dekkers, Evelien de Boer, and Stefaan De Henauw. 2010. “Urinary Creatinine as a Biomarker in Nutritional and Epidemiological Studies.” In Public Health Nutrition, 13:?–?
APA
De Keyzer, W., Huybrechts, I., Crispim, S., Geelen, A., Dekkers, A., de Boer, E., & De Henauw, S. (2010). Urinary creatinine as a biomarker in nutritional and epidemiological studies. PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION (Vol. 13, p. ?–?). Presented at the 2nd World congress of Public Health Nutrition ; 1st Latinamerican congress of Community Nutrition (Nutrition 2010).
Vancouver
1.
De Keyzer W, Huybrechts I, Crispim S, Geelen A, Dekkers A, de Boer E, et al. Urinary creatinine as a biomarker in nutritional and epidemiological studies. PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION. 2010. p. ?–?
MLA
De Keyzer, Willem, Inge Huybrechts, Sandra Crispim, et al. “Urinary Creatinine as a Biomarker in Nutritional and Epidemiological Studies.” Public Health Nutrition. Vol. 13. 2010. ?–? Print.
@inproceedings{1060365,
  abstract     = {Background: Acquiring accurate dietary information is a common problem in nutritional and epidemiological research. To evaluate the validity of dietary assessment methods, biomarkers from 24h urine collections are commonly used. However, obtaining complete collections is a prerequisite for this approach. 
Aim: To assess the performance of urinary creatinine as a biomarker for identification of incomplete 24h urine collections.
Methods: Data was taken from the EFCOVAL project in which 2 non-consecutive 24h urine collections were obtained from 600 subjects (age: 45-65 y) in 5 European countries. Completeness was verified by the ratio of observed to expected creatinine excretion and compared to the recovery of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA). Cut-offs under which collections were considered incomplete were 0.7 for creatinine and 85% for PABA. Performance was assessed by calculation of sensitivity and specificity.
Results: 580 duplicate urine collections were available. For the first and second collection, respectively 7.0% and 11.1% in males (ns) and 7.5% and 14.7% in females (P<0.01), were identified as incomplete by PABA. Sensitivity and specificity of urinary creatinine in males was 0.30 and 0.94 for the first, and 0.22 and 0.99 for the second collection. In females, sensitivity and specificity was 0.64 and 0.79 for the first, and 0.53 and 0.81 for the second collection. For both collections, the percentage misclassification was higher in women compared to men (10.4% and 9.4% for men, 21.8% and 22.9% for women).
Conclusion: Compared to PABA, urinary creatinine has a low sensitivity for identifying incomplete 24h urine collections in European adults. Therefore, careful interpretation is warranted when used in nutritional and epidemiological research.
Acknowledgement: The EFCOVAL project is supported by the EC (FP6). This abstract reflects only the author’s views and the Community is not liable for any use that may be made of the information contained therein.},
  author       = {De Keyzer, Willem and Huybrechts, Inge and Crispim, Sandra and Geelen, Anouk and Dekkers, Arnold and de Boer, Evelien and De Henauw, Stefaan},
  booktitle    = {PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION},
  issn         = {1368-9800},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Porto, Portugal},
  number       = {9a},
  pages        = {?--?},
  title        = {Urinary creatinine as a biomarker in nutritional and epidemiological studies},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2010},
}