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David Mitchell's Ghostwritten and 'The Novel of Globalization': biopower and the Secret History of the Novel

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Abstract
David Mitchell's debut novel Ghostwritten (1999) not only depicts a globalized world; its peculiar formal organization also embodies the mode of relatedness that characterizes globalization. This article shows that the invisible, decentralized power that defines globalization can be understood as what Michel Foucault called biopower. As a novel of globalization, Mitchell's novel lays bare the hidden historical and theoretical affinities between the novel genre on the one hand and biopower on the other.
Keywords
Michel Foucault, novel theory, globalization, David Mitchell, biopolitics

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Vermeulen, Pieter. 2012. “David Mitchell’s Ghostwritten and ‘The Novel of Globalization’: Biopower and the Secret History of the Novel.” Critique-studies in Contemporary Fiction 53 (4): 381–392.
APA
Vermeulen, P. (2012). David Mitchell’s Ghostwritten and “The Novel of Globalization”: biopower and the Secret History of the Novel. CRITIQUE-STUDIES IN CONTEMPORARY FICTION, 53(4), 381–392.
Vancouver
1.
Vermeulen P. David Mitchell’s Ghostwritten and “The Novel of Globalization”: biopower and the Secret History of the Novel. CRITIQUE-STUDIES IN CONTEMPORARY FICTION. 2012;53(4):381–92.
MLA
Vermeulen, Pieter. “David Mitchell’s Ghostwritten and ‘The Novel of Globalization’: Biopower and the Secret History of the Novel.” CRITIQUE-STUDIES IN CONTEMPORARY FICTION 53.4 (2012): 381–392. Print.
@article{1058994,
  abstract     = {David Mitchell's debut novel Ghostwritten (1999) not only depicts a globalized world; its peculiar formal organization also embodies the mode of relatedness that characterizes globalization. This article shows that the invisible, decentralized power that defines globalization can be understood as what Michel Foucault called biopower. As a novel of globalization, Mitchell's novel lays bare the hidden historical and theoretical affinities between the novel genre on the one hand and biopower on the other.},
  author       = {Vermeulen, Pieter},
  issn         = {0011-1619},
  journal      = {CRITIQUE-STUDIES IN CONTEMPORARY FICTION},
  keyword      = {Michel Foucault,novel theory,globalization,David Mitchell,biopolitics},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {381--392},
  title        = {David Mitchell's Ghostwritten and 'The Novel of Globalization': biopower and the Secret History of the Novel},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00111619.2010.511318},
  volume       = {53},
  year         = {2012},
}

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