Advanced search
1 file | 328.97 KB

Information use and density-dependent dispersal in an agrobiont spider

Nele De Meester (UGent) and Dries Bonte (UGent)
(2010) BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY. 21(5). p.992-998
Author
Organization
Abstract
Density of conspecifics is considered as one of the main conditions affecting dispersal behavior and leading to a stabilization of population dynamics. Density-dependent dispersal can be induced by local competition at different phases during development and/or by density-related sources of social information. Here, we assessed the importance of population density on emigration rates and the degree to which the presence of silk threads at dispersal takeoff locations affects immediate dispersal decision making in the spider Erigone atra. By quantifying behaviors in wind tunnels under standardized laboratory conditions, silk-assisted long-and short-distance dispersal is quantified before the actual onset of the dispersal event. Increased densities during juvenile development only affected short-distance dispersal behavior. In females, short-distance dispersal increased with the female density experienced during development, whereas responses in males increased under combined high male/low female-experienced densities. Elevated densities at the onset of dispersal led to a general increase of predispersal behaviors. The presence of silk threads at takeoff platforms similarly induced an increase of dispersal displays, with specifically an increase in long-distance dispersal in both sexes. Our results demonstrate that the spider E. atra uses information related to density during development, most probably to avoid competition by performing short-distance dispersal. In contrast, density-related cues at the time of dispersal (i.e., increased densities and the presence of silk threads) increase general dispersal activities and long-distance ballooning events. Short-and long-distance dispersal strategies are consequently guided by differential density-related information use.
Keywords
density, araneae, dispersal, information, silk, LONG-DISTANCE DISPERSAL, SEX-BIASED DISPERSAL, AERIAL DISPERSAL, ERIGONE-ATRA, WOLF SPIDER, EVOLUTION, BEHAVIOR, ARANEAE, POPULATIONS, CONSEQUENCES

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 328.97 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
De Meester, Nele, and Dries Bonte. 2010. “Information Use and Density-dependent Dispersal in an Agrobiont Spider.” Behavioral Ecology 21 (5): 992–998.
APA
De Meester, N., & Bonte, D. (2010). Information use and density-dependent dispersal in an agrobiont spider. BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY, 21(5), 992–998.
Vancouver
1.
De Meester N, Bonte D. Information use and density-dependent dispersal in an agrobiont spider. BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY. 2010;21(5):992–8.
MLA
De Meester, Nele, and Dries Bonte. “Information Use and Density-dependent Dispersal in an Agrobiont Spider.” BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY 21.5 (2010): 992–998. Print.
@article{1058212,
  abstract     = {Density of conspecifics is considered as one of the main conditions affecting dispersal behavior and leading to a stabilization of population dynamics. Density-dependent dispersal can be induced by local competition at different phases during development and/or by density-related sources of social information. Here, we assessed the importance of population density on emigration rates and the degree to which the presence of silk threads at dispersal takeoff locations affects immediate dispersal decision making in the spider Erigone atra. By quantifying behaviors in wind tunnels under standardized laboratory conditions, silk-assisted long-and short-distance dispersal is quantified before the actual onset of the dispersal event.
Increased densities during juvenile development only affected short-distance dispersal behavior. In females, short-distance dispersal increased with the female density experienced during development, whereas responses in males increased under combined high male/low female-experienced densities. Elevated densities at the onset of dispersal led to a general increase of predispersal behaviors. The presence of silk threads at takeoff platforms similarly induced an increase of dispersal displays, with specifically an increase in long-distance dispersal in both sexes.
Our results demonstrate that the spider E. atra uses information related to density during development, most probably to avoid competition by performing short-distance dispersal. In contrast, density-related cues at the time of dispersal (i.e., increased densities and the presence of silk threads) increase general dispersal activities and long-distance ballooning events. Short-and long-distance dispersal strategies are consequently guided by differential density-related information use.},
  author       = {De Meester, Nele and Bonte, Dries},
  issn         = {1045-2249},
  journal      = {BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY},
  keyword      = {density,araneae,dispersal,information,silk,LONG-DISTANCE DISPERSAL,SEX-BIASED DISPERSAL,AERIAL DISPERSAL,ERIGONE-ATRA,WOLF SPIDER,EVOLUTION,BEHAVIOR,ARANEAE,POPULATIONS,CONSEQUENCES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {992--998},
  title        = {Information use and density-dependent dispersal in an agrobiont spider},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arq088},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2010},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: