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Copper enhances the activity and salt resistance of mixed methane-oxidizing communities

David van der Ha (UGent) , Sven Hoefman (UGent) , Pascal Boeckx (UGent) , Willy Verstraete (UGent) and Nico Boon (UGent)
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Abstract
Effluents of anaerobic digesters are an underestimated source of greenhouse gases, as they are often saturated with methane. A post-treatment with methane-oxidizing bacterial consortia could mitigate diffuse emissions at such sites. Semi-continuously fed stirred reactors were used as model systems to characterize the influence of the key parameters on the activity of these mixed methanotrophic communities. The addition of 140 mg L-1 NH (4) (+) -N had no significant influence on the activity nor did a temperature increase from 28A degrees C to 35A degrees C. On the other hand, addition of 0.64 mg L-1 of copper(II) increased the methane removal rate by a factor of 1.5 to 1.7 since the activity of particulate methane monooxygenase was enhanced. The influence of different concentrations of NaCl was also tested, as effluents of anaerobic digesters often contain salt levels up to 10 g NaCl L-1. At a concentration of 11 g NaCl L-1, almost no methane-oxidizing activity was observed in the reactors without copper addition. Yet, reactors with copper addition exhibited a sustained activity in the presence of NaCl. A colorimetric test based on naphthalene oxidation showed that soluble methane monooxygenase was inhibited by copper, suggesting that the particulate methane monooxygenase was the active enzyme and thus more salt resistant. The results obtained demonstrate that the treatment of methane-saturated effluents, even those with increased ammonium (up to 140 mg L-1 NH (4) (+) -N) and salt levels, can be mitigated by implementation of methane-oxidizing microbial consortia.
Keywords
Biofilter, Greenhouse gas, Osmotic pressure, Salt stress, METHYLOSINUS-TRICHOSPORIUM OB3B, CH4 OXIDATION, METHANOTROPHIC BACTERIA, ATMOSPHERIC METHANE, CONTINUOUS CULTURE, NH4+ INHIBITION, WASTE-WATER, SOILS, MONOOXYGENASE, KINETICS

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Chicago
van der Ha, David, Sven Hoefman, Pascal Boeckx, Willy Verstraete, and Nico Boon. 2010. “Copper Enhances the Activity and Salt Resistance of Mixed Methane-oxidizing Communities.” Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology 87 (6): 2355–2363.
APA
van der Ha, D., Hoefman, S., Boeckx, P., Verstraete, W., & Boon, N. (2010). Copper enhances the activity and salt resistance of mixed methane-oxidizing communities. APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY, 87(6), 2355–2363.
Vancouver
1.
van der Ha D, Hoefman S, Boeckx P, Verstraete W, Boon N. Copper enhances the activity and salt resistance of mixed methane-oxidizing communities. APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY. 2010;87(6):2355–63.
MLA
van der Ha, David, Sven Hoefman, Pascal Boeckx, et al. “Copper Enhances the Activity and Salt Resistance of Mixed Methane-oxidizing Communities.” APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY 87.6 (2010): 2355–2363. Print.
@article{1056776,
  abstract     = {Effluents of anaerobic digesters are an underestimated source of greenhouse gases, as they are often saturated with methane. A post-treatment with methane-oxidizing bacterial consortia could mitigate diffuse emissions at such sites. Semi-continuously fed stirred reactors were used as model systems to characterize the influence of the key parameters on the activity of these mixed methanotrophic communities. The addition of 140 mg L-1 NH (4) (+) -N had no significant influence on the activity nor did a temperature increase from 28A degrees C to 35A degrees C. On the other hand, addition of 0.64 mg L-1 of copper(II) increased the methane removal rate by a factor of 1.5 to 1.7 since the activity of particulate methane monooxygenase was enhanced. The influence of different concentrations of NaCl was also tested, as effluents of anaerobic digesters often contain salt levels up to 10 g NaCl L-1. At a concentration of 11 g NaCl L-1, almost no methane-oxidizing activity was observed in the reactors without copper addition. Yet, reactors with copper addition exhibited a sustained activity in the presence of NaCl. A colorimetric test based on naphthalene oxidation showed that soluble methane monooxygenase was inhibited by copper, suggesting that the particulate methane monooxygenase was the active enzyme and thus more salt resistant. The results obtained demonstrate that the treatment of methane-saturated effluents, even those with increased ammonium (up to 140 mg L-1 NH (4) (+) -N) and salt levels, can be mitigated by implementation of methane-oxidizing microbial consortia.},
  author       = {van der Ha, David and Hoefman, Sven and Boeckx, Pascal and Verstraete, Willy and Boon, Nico},
  issn         = {0175-7598},
  journal      = {APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY},
  keyword      = {Biofilter,Greenhouse gas,Osmotic pressure,Salt stress,METHYLOSINUS-TRICHOSPORIUM OB3B,CH4 OXIDATION,METHANOTROPHIC BACTERIA,ATMOSPHERIC METHANE,CONTINUOUS CULTURE,NH4+ INHIBITION,WASTE-WATER,SOILS,MONOOXYGENASE,KINETICS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {2355--2363},
  title        = {Copper enhances the activity and salt resistance of mixed methane-oxidizing communities},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-010-2702-4},
  volume       = {87},
  year         = {2010},
}

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