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Photonic skin for pressure and strain sensing

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Abstract
In this paper, we report on the strain and pressure testing of highly flexible skins embedded with Bragg grating sensors recorded in either silica or polymer optical fibre. The photonic skins, with a size of 10cm x 10cm and thickness of 1mm, were fabricated by embedding the polymer fibre or silica fibre containing Bragg gratings in Sylgard 184 from Dow Corning. Pressure sensing was studied using a cylindrical metal post placed on an array of points across the skin. The polymer fibre grating exhibits approximately 10 times the pressure sensitivity of the silica fibre and responds to the post even when it is placed a few centimetres away from the sensing fibre. Although the intrinsic strain sensitivities of gratings in the two fibre types are very similar, when embedded in the skin the polymer grating displayed a strain sensitivity approximately 45 times greater than the silica device, which also suffered from considerable hysteresis. The polymer grating displayed a near linear response over wavelength shifts of 9nm for 1% strain. The difference in behaviour we attribute to the much greater Young’s modulus of the silica fibre (70 GPa) compared to the polymer fibre (3 GPa).
Keywords
Photonic skin, optical fibre, BRAGG GRATINGS, GRATING SENSORS, POLYMER OPTICAL-FIBERS, loading, pressure, strain, polymer optical fibre, sensor, Bragg grating

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Chicago
Chen, Xianfeng, C Zhang, Bram Van Hoe, David J Webb, Kyriacos Kalli, Geert Van Steenberge, and G-D Peng. 2010. “Photonic Skin for Pressure and Strain Sensing.” In Proceedings of Spie - the International Society for Optical Engineering, ed. Francis Berghmans, Anna Grazia Mignani, and Chris A van Hoof. Vol. 7726. Bellingham, WA, USA: SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering.
APA
Chen, Xianfeng, Zhang, C., Van Hoe, B., Webb, D. J., Kalli, K., Van Steenberge, G., & Peng, G.-D. (2010). Photonic skin for pressure and strain sensing. In Francis Berghmans, A. G. Mignani, & C. A. van Hoof (Eds.), PROCEEDINGS OF SPIE - THE INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR OPTICAL ENGINEERING (Vol. 7726). Presented at the Conference on Optical Sensing and Detection, Bellingham, WA, USA: SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering.
Vancouver
1.
Chen X, Zhang C, Van Hoe B, Webb DJ, Kalli K, Van Steenberge G, et al. Photonic skin for pressure and strain sensing. In: Berghmans F, Mignani AG, van Hoof CA, editors. PROCEEDINGS OF SPIE - THE INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR OPTICAL ENGINEERING. Bellingham, WA, USA: SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering; 2010.
MLA
Chen, Xianfeng, C Zhang, Bram Van Hoe, et al. “Photonic Skin for Pressure and Strain Sensing.” Proceedings of Spie - the International Society for Optical Engineering. Ed. Francis Berghmans, Anna Grazia Mignani, & Chris A van Hoof. Vol. 7726. Bellingham, WA, USA: SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering, 2010. Print.
@inproceedings{1045002,
  abstract     = {In this paper, we report on the strain and pressure testing of highly flexible skins embedded with Bragg grating sensors recorded in either silica or polymer optical fibre. The photonic skins, with a size of 10cm x 10cm and thickness of 1mm, were fabricated by embedding the polymer fibre or silica fibre containing Bragg gratings in Sylgard 184 from Dow Corning. Pressure sensing was studied using a cylindrical metal post placed on an array of points across the skin. The polymer fibre grating exhibits approximately 10 times the pressure sensitivity of the silica fibre and responds to the post even when it is placed a few centimetres away from the sensing fibre. Although the intrinsic strain sensitivities of gratings in the two fibre types are very similar, when embedded in the skin the polymer grating displayed a strain sensitivity approximately 45 times greater than the silica device, which also suffered from considerable hysteresis. The polymer grating displayed a near linear response over wavelength shifts of 9nm for 1% strain. The difference in behaviour we attribute to the much greater Young’s modulus of the silica fibre (70 GPa) compared to the polymer fibre (3 GPa).},
  articleno    = {772604},
  author       = {Chen, Xianfeng and Zhang, C and Van Hoe, Bram and Webb, David J and Kalli, Kyriacos and Van Steenberge, Geert and Peng, G-D},
  booktitle    = {PROCEEDINGS OF SPIE - THE INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR OPTICAL ENGINEERING},
  editor       = {Berghmans, Francis and Mignani, Anna Grazia and van Hoof, Chris A},
  isbn         = {9780819481993},
  issn         = {0277-786X},
  keywords     = {Photonic skin,optical fibre,BRAGG GRATINGS,GRATING SENSORS,POLYMER OPTICAL-FIBERS,loading,pressure,strain,polymer optical fibre,sensor,Bragg grating},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Brussels, Belgium},
  number       = {Optical Sensing and Detection},
  pages        = {9},
  publisher    = {SPIE, the International Society for Optical Engineering},
  title        = {Photonic skin for pressure and strain sensing},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.854235},
  volume       = {7726},
  year         = {2010},
}

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