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Social support as a form of social capital in status attainment research. An explorative study.

(2010) MARKETS AS NETWORKS. p.201-216
Author
Organization
Abstract
This study examines both theoretically and empirically whether social support can be considered as a form of social capital or not. Theoretically, the social support concept satisfies the conditions of the social capital conceptualisation and the main objections do not stand fire after a critical inquiry. Empirically, two well-established social capital propositions are tested with social support conceptualized as a form of social capital, using data about the attained holiday job of first year university student. For this purposes, a specific application of the resource generator with job search support items has been designed. The results confirm both the social resource proposition and the strength of ties proposition. The perceived availability of job search support seems to have a positive effect on the income and the quality of the attained holiday job. Especially instrumental job search support appears to be useful with respect to the income. In addition, it appears that job search support from the immediate and extended family (strong ties) is more effective that support from friends (middle ties) and acquaintances (weak ties).
Keywords
Tie Strength, Job Search Support, Resource Generator, Status Attainment, Social Capital, University Students, Social Support

Citation

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Chicago
Verhaeghe, Pieter-Paul, and Bart Van de Putte. 2010. “Social Support as a Form of Social Capital in Status Attainment Research. An Explorative Study.” In Markets as Networks, 201–216. Sofia: St. Kliment Ohridski University Press.
APA
Verhaeghe, P.-P., & Van de Putte, B. (2010). Social support as a form of social capital in status attainment research. An explorative study. MARKETS AS NETWORKS (pp. 201–216). Sofia: St. Kliment Ohridski University Press.
Vancouver
1.
Verhaeghe P-P, Van de Putte B. Social support as a form of social capital in status attainment research. An explorative study. MARKETS AS NETWORKS. Sofia: St. Kliment Ohridski University Press; 2010. p. 201–16.
MLA
Verhaeghe, Pieter-Paul, and Bart Van de Putte. “Social Support as a Form of Social Capital in Status Attainment Research. An Explorative Study.” Markets as Networks. Sofia: St. Kliment Ohridski University Press, 2010. 201–216. Print.
@incollection{1044350,
  abstract     = {This study examines both theoretically and empirically whether social support can be considered as a form of social capital or not. Theoretically, the social support concept satisfies the conditions of the social capital conceptualisation and the main objections do not stand fire after a critical inquiry. Empirically, two well-established social capital propositions are tested with social support conceptualized as a form of social capital, using data about the attained holiday job of first year university student. For this purposes, a specific application of the resource generator with job search support items has been designed. The results confirm both the social resource proposition and the strength of ties proposition. The perceived availability of job search support seems to have a positive effect on the income and the quality of the attained holiday job. Especially instrumental job search support appears to be useful with respect to the income. In addition, it appears that job search support from the immediate and extended family (strong ties) is more effective that support from friends (middle ties) and acquaintances (weak ties).},
  author       = {Verhaeghe, Pieter-Paul and Van de Putte, Bart},
  booktitle    = {MARKETS AS NETWORKS},
  isbn         = {978-954-07-3042-4},
  keyword      = {Tie Strength,Job Search Support,Resource Generator,Status Attainment,Social Capital,University Students,Social Support},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {201--216},
  publisher    = {St. Kliment Ohridski University Press},
  title        = {Social support as a form of social capital in status attainment research. An explorative study.},
  year         = {2010},
}