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Differences in guilt and shame amongst Belgians and Turkish immigrants: Contrasting the guilt and shame culture hypothesis

Hans Groenvynck UGent (2008) Book of abstracts of the 19th international congress of the international association for cross-cultural psychology. p.586-586
abstract
Starting with Ruth Benedict and Margaret Mead, there is a long-standing hypothesis in cross-cultural psychology that cultural groups differ in the salience of guilt and shame. This hypothesis has been taken up by recent theorizing on Mediterranean Muslim immigrants in Western societies. In comparison with the majority group, shame would be more salient and guilt less salient among Mediterranean Muslim immigrants. This hypothesis is tested with Turkish immigrants in Belgium. Moreover, it is investigated whether guilt and shame proneness is related to acculturation within the immigrant group. A newly constructed scenario instrument was used that consists of eight typical guilt and shame scenario’s and 25 typical guilt and shame reactions (appraisals, subjective experiences and action tendencies). A factor analysis on the guilt and shame reactions revealed an equivalent two-factorial structure in both cultural groups: not with a guilt and shame factor, but with a guilt and humiliation factor (with shame loading on both factors). In line with the prediction, Turkish immigrants in Belgium report more humiliation reactions. Contrary to the prediction, the Turkish immigrants also report substantially more guilt reactions. Moreover, only a small relationship is found between acculturation and guilt and humiliation proneness within the immigrant group: maintenance is related to more guilt-proneness. The present study thus disconfirms the hypothesis guilt would be far less salient than shame among Mediterranean Muslim immigrants compared to the western majority.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
unpublished
subject
keyword
guilt, shame, cross-cultural psychology
in
Book of abstracts of the 19th international congress of the international association for cross-cultural psychology
editor
Franziska Deutsch, Lidet Tadesse, Natalie Schnelle, Jessica Price and Klaus Boehnke
pages
586 - 586
publisher
Jacobs University
place of publication
Bremen, Germany
conference name
19th International Congress of the International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology (IACCP - 2008)
conference location
Bremen, Germany
conference start
2008-07-27
conference end
2008-07-31
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C3
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
1043483
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1043483
alternative location
http://wwwback.jacobs-university.de/imperia/md/content/groups/schools/shss/teamis/iaccp_book_of_abstracts_26_6.pd
date created
2010-09-19 14:55:42
date last changed
2017-01-02 09:52:18
@inproceedings{1043483,
  abstract     = {Starting with Ruth Benedict and Margaret Mead, there is a long-standing hypothesis in cross-cultural psychology that cultural groups differ in the salience of guilt and shame. This hypothesis has been taken up by recent theorizing on Mediterranean Muslim immigrants in Western societies. In comparison with the majority group, shame would be more salient and guilt less salient among Mediterranean Muslim immigrants. This hypothesis is tested with Turkish immigrants in Belgium. Moreover, it is investigated whether guilt and shame proneness is related to acculturation within the immigrant group. A newly constructed scenario instrument was used that consists of eight typical guilt and shame scenario{\textquoteright}s and 25 typical guilt and shame reactions (appraisals, subjective experiences and action tendencies). A factor analysis on the guilt and shame reactions revealed an equivalent two-factorial structure in both cultural groups: not with a guilt and shame factor, but with a guilt and humiliation factor (with shame loading on both factors). In line with the prediction, Turkish immigrants in Belgium report more humiliation reactions. Contrary to the prediction, the Turkish immigrants also report substantially more guilt reactions. Moreover, only a small relationship is found between acculturation and guilt and humiliation proneness within the immigrant group: maintenance is related to more guilt-proneness. The present study thus disconfirms the hypothesis guilt would be far less salient than shame among Mediterranean Muslim immigrants compared to the western majority.},
  author       = {Groenvynck, Hans},
  booktitle    = {Book of abstracts of the 19th international congress of the international association for cross-cultural psychology},
  editor       = {Deutsch, Franziska  and Tadesse, Lidet  and Schnelle, Natalie  and Price, Jessica  and Boehnke, Klaus },
  keyword      = {guilt,shame,cross-cultural psychology},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Bremen, Germany},
  pages        = {586--586},
  publisher    = {Jacobs University},
  title        = {Differences in guilt and shame amongst Belgians and Turkish immigrants: Contrasting the guilt and shame culture hypothesis},
  url          = {http://wwwback.jacobs-university.de/imperia/md/content/groups/schools/shss/teamis/iaccp\_book\_of\_abstracts\_26\_6.pd},
  year         = {2008},
}

Chicago
Groenvynck, Hans. 2008. “Differences in Guilt and Shame Amongst Belgians and Turkish Immigrants: Contrasting the Guilt and Shame Culture Hypothesis.” In Book of Abstracts of the 19th International Congress of the International Association for Cross-cultural Psychology, ed. Franziska Deutsch, Lidet Tadesse, Natalie Schnelle, Jessica Price, and Klaus Boehnke, 586–586. Bremen, Germany: Jacobs University.
APA
Groenvynck, H. (2008). Differences in guilt and shame amongst Belgians and Turkish immigrants: Contrasting the guilt and shame culture hypothesis. In F. Deutsch, L. Tadesse, N. Schnelle, J. Price, & K. Boehnke (Eds.), Book of abstracts of the 19th international congress of the international association for cross-cultural psychology (pp. 586–586). Presented at the 19th International Congress of the International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology (IACCP - 2008), Bremen, Germany: Jacobs University.
Vancouver
1.
Groenvynck H. Differences in guilt and shame amongst Belgians and Turkish immigrants: Contrasting the guilt and shame culture hypothesis. In: Deutsch F, Tadesse L, Schnelle N, Price J, Boehnke K, editors. Book of abstracts of the 19th international congress of the international association for cross-cultural psychology. Bremen, Germany: Jacobs University; 2008. p. 586–586.
MLA
Groenvynck, Hans. “Differences in Guilt and Shame Amongst Belgians and Turkish Immigrants: Contrasting the Guilt and Shame Culture Hypothesis.” Book of Abstracts of the 19th International Congress of the International Association for Cross-cultural Psychology. Ed. Franziska Deutsch et al. Bremen, Germany: Jacobs University, 2008. 586–586. Print.