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Post-Conflict Ambon: Forced Migration and the Ethno-Territorial Effects of Customary Tenure

Jeroen Adam UGent (2010) Development and Change. 41(3). p.401-419
abstract
In post-conflict contexts characterized by large-scale migration and increasing levels of legal pluralism, customary land tenure risks being deployed as a tool of ethno-territorialization in which displaced communities are denied return and secure land rights. This thesis will be illustrated through a case study of the Indonesian island of Ambon where a recognition of customary tenure — also called adat — was initiated in 2005 at the end of a highintensity conflict between Christians and Muslims. Although a system of land tenure providing multiple forms of social security for the indigenous in-group, adat in Ambon also constitutes an arena of power in which populations considered as non-indigenous to a fixed historical territory are pushed into an inferior legal position. The legal registration of customary tenure therefore tends to be deployed to settle long-standing land contests with a growing migrant community, hereby legally enforcing some of the forced expulsions that were brought about by the recent communal violence.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
INDONESIA, LAND, POLITICS, REFORM, ADAT
journal title
Development and Change
Dev. Change
volume
41
issue
3
pages
18 pages
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000279162200002
JCR category
PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT
JCR impact factor
1.359 (2010)
JCR rank
14/47 (2010)
JCR quartile
2 (2010)
ISSN
0012-155X
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1038320
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1038320
date created
2010-09-07 17:19:39
date last changed
2010-09-08 10:25:00
@article{1038320,
  abstract     = {In post-conflict contexts characterized by large-scale migration and increasing levels of legal pluralism, customary land tenure risks being deployed as a tool of ethno-territorialization in which displaced communities are denied
return and secure land rights. This thesis will be illustrated through a case study of the Indonesian island of Ambon where a recognition of customary tenure --- also called adat --- was initiated in 2005 at the end of a highintensity conflict between Christians and Muslims. Although a system of land tenure providing multiple forms of social security for the indigenous
in-group, adat in Ambon also constitutes an arena of power in which populations considered as non-indigenous to a fixed historical territory are pushed into an inferior legal position. The legal registration of customary tenure therefore tends to be deployed to settle long-standing land contests with a
growing migrant community, hereby legally enforcing some of the forced expulsions that were brought about by the recent communal violence.},
  author       = {Adam, Jeroen},
  issn         = {0012-155X},
  journal      = {Development and Change},
  keyword      = {INDONESIA,LAND,POLITICS,REFORM,ADAT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {401--419},
  title        = {Post-Conflict Ambon: Forced Migration and the Ethno-Territorial Effects of Customary Tenure},
  volume       = {41},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Adam, Jeroen. 2010. “Post-Conflict Ambon: Forced Migration and the Ethno-Territorial Effects of Customary Tenure.” Development and Change 41 (3): 401–419.
APA
Adam, Jeroen. (2010). Post-Conflict Ambon: Forced Migration and the Ethno-Territorial Effects of Customary Tenure. Development and Change, 41(3), 401–419.
Vancouver
1.
Adam J. Post-Conflict Ambon: Forced Migration and the Ethno-Territorial Effects of Customary Tenure. Development and Change. 2010;41(3):401–19.
MLA
Adam, Jeroen. “Post-Conflict Ambon: Forced Migration and the Ethno-Territorial Effects of Customary Tenure.” Development and Change 41.3 (2010): 401–419. Print.