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Structural Determinants of Boredom Among the Clients of Psychosocial and Vocational Rehabilitation Centers

Piet Bracke UGent and Mieke Verhaeghe UGent (2010) Journal of Applied Social Psychology. 40(8). p.1969-1998
abstract
In psychosocial rehabilitation programs, clients are encouraged to counter boredom by occupying their time in more structured, meaningful, and enjoyable ways. Several means by which the structure of service organizations reduces feelings of boredom were explored. Hypotheses were tested using data from a sample of clients of Flemish rehabilitation centers for people with chronic mental health problems. Results show that in larger, more heterogeneous centers, boredom is reduced by offering clients a wider range of more routinized activities; in small homogeneous centers, the same effect is obtained by enhancing the intrinsic value of the tasks and by providing more opportunities for task communication. Rehabilitation centers seem to adapt their rehabilitation technology according to their organizational structure.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
INTRINSIC MOTIVATION, TECHNOLOGY, MEANINGLESSNESS, ALIENATION, PRONENESS, WORK, SIZE, DIFFERENTIATION, LIFE, HUMAN-SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS
journal title
Journal of Applied Social Psychology
J. Appl. Soc. Psychol.
volume
40
issue
8
pages
30 pages
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000280980400006
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, SOCIAL
JCR impact factor
0.721 (2010)
JCR rank
48/55 (2010)
JCR quartile
4 (2010)
ISSN
0021-9029
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I don't know the status of the copyright for this publication
id
1038298
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1038298
date created
2010-09-07 16:32:01
date last changed
2015-06-17 09:12:21
@article{1038298,
  abstract     = {In psychosocial rehabilitation programs, clients are encouraged to counter boredom by occupying their time in more structured, meaningful, and enjoyable ways. Several means by which the structure of service organizations reduces feelings of boredom were explored. Hypotheses were tested using data from a sample of clients of Flemish rehabilitation centers for people with chronic mental health problems. Results show that in larger, more heterogeneous centers, boredom is reduced by offering clients a wider range of more routinized activities; in small homogeneous centers, the same effect is obtained by enhancing the intrinsic value of the tasks and by providing more opportunities for task communication. Rehabilitation centers seem to adapt their rehabilitation technology according to their organizational structure.},
  author       = {Bracke, Piet and Verhaeghe, Mieke},
  issn         = {0021-9029},
  journal      = {Journal of Applied Social Psychology},
  keyword      = {INTRINSIC MOTIVATION,TECHNOLOGY,MEANINGLESSNESS,ALIENATION,PRONENESS,WORK,SIZE,DIFFERENTIATION,LIFE,HUMAN-SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {1969--1998},
  title        = {Structural Determinants of Boredom Among the Clients of Psychosocial and Vocational Rehabilitation Centers},
  volume       = {40},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Bracke, Piet, and Mieke Verhaeghe. 2010. “Structural Determinants of Boredom Among the Clients of Psychosocial and Vocational Rehabilitation Centers.” Journal of Applied Social Psychology 40 (8): 1969–1998.
APA
Bracke, P., & Verhaeghe, M. (2010). Structural Determinants of Boredom Among the Clients of Psychosocial and Vocational Rehabilitation Centers. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 40(8), 1969–1998.
Vancouver
1.
Bracke P, Verhaeghe M. Structural Determinants of Boredom Among the Clients of Psychosocial and Vocational Rehabilitation Centers. Journal of Applied Social Psychology. 2010;40(8):1969–98.
MLA
Bracke, Piet, and Mieke Verhaeghe. “Structural Determinants of Boredom Among the Clients of Psychosocial and Vocational Rehabilitation Centers.” Journal of Applied Social Psychology 40.8 (2010): 1969–1998. Print.