Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Th2-associated immunity to bacteria in teenagers and susceptibility to asthma

Elysia M Hollams, BJ Hales, Claus Bachert UGent, Wouter Huvenne UGent, F Parsons, NH de Klerk, M Serralha, BJ Holt, S Ahlstedt, WR Thomas, et al. (2010) EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL. 36(3). p.509-516
abstract
Bacterial colonisation of the airways is associated with increased risk for childhood asthma. IgE against bacterial antigens has been reported in some asthmatics, suggesting a role for bacterial-specific Type-2 immunity in disease pathogenesis. We aimed to investigate relationships between bacterial-specific IgE amongst teenagers and asthma susceptibility.We measured titres of IgE against Haemophilus influenzae(HI), Streptococcus pneumonia(SP) and Staphylococcus aureus(SA) in 1380 teenagers, and related these to asthma symptomatology and immunophenotypes.IgE titres against SA-derived enterotoxins were highest amongst atopics and were associated with asthma risk. Surprisingly, IgE titres against HI and SP surface antigens were higher and not stratified by atopy, and independently associated with decreased asthma risk.The positive association between Type-2 immunity to SA and asthma phenotypes likely reflects IgE-mediated effector cell activation via enterotoxin antigens which are secreted in soluble form. The contrasting benign nature of Type-2 immunity to HI and SP antigens may reflect their lower availability in soluble forms that can crosslink IgE receptors. We theorise that they may instead be processed by antigen presenting cells and presented to Type-2 memory cells leading to mucosal secretion of IL-4/IL-13, a mechanism widely recognised in other tissues to attenuate Th1-associated bacterial-induced inflammation.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
bacteria, Staphylococcal enterotoxin, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, immunoglobulin E, NONTYPABLE HAEMOPHILUS-INFLUENZAE, ATOPIC-DERMATITIS, BRONCHIAL-ASTHMA, IMMUNOGLOBULIN-E, IL-10 PRODUCTION, IGE ANTIBODIES, HIGH-RISK, Raine study, Asthma, CHILDREN, DISEASE, STAPHYLOCOCCAL-ENTEROTOXIN-B
journal title
EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL
Eur. Resp. J.
volume
36
issue
3
pages
509 - 516
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000282470000011
JCR category
RESPIRATORY SYSTEM
JCR impact factor
5.922 (2010)
JCR rank
4/45 (2010)
JCR quartile
1 (2010)
ISSN
0903-1936
DOI
10.1183/09031936.00184109
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1035727
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1035727
date created
2010-09-01 16:38:08
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:46:25
@article{1035727,
  abstract     = {Bacterial colonisation of the airways is associated with increased risk for childhood asthma. IgE against bacterial antigens has been reported in some asthmatics, suggesting a role for bacterial-specific Type-2 immunity in disease pathogenesis. We aimed to investigate relationships between bacterial-specific IgE amongst teenagers and asthma susceptibility.We measured titres of IgE against Haemophilus influenzae(HI), Streptococcus pneumonia(SP) and Staphylococcus aureus(SA) in 1380 teenagers, and related these to asthma symptomatology and immunophenotypes.IgE titres against SA-derived enterotoxins were highest amongst atopics and were associated with asthma risk. Surprisingly, IgE titres against HI and SP surface antigens were higher and not stratified by atopy, and independently associated with decreased asthma risk.The positive association between Type-2 immunity to SA and asthma phenotypes likely reflects IgE-mediated effector cell activation via enterotoxin antigens which are secreted in soluble form. The contrasting benign nature of Type-2 immunity to HI and SP antigens may reflect their lower availability in soluble forms that can crosslink IgE receptors. We theorise that they may instead be processed by antigen presenting cells and presented to Type-2 memory cells leading to mucosal secretion of IL-4/IL-13, a mechanism widely recognised in other tissues to attenuate Th1-associated bacterial-induced inflammation.},
  author       = {Hollams, Elysia M and Hales, BJ and Bachert, Claus and Huvenne, Wouter and Parsons, F and de Klerk, NH and Serralha, M and Holt, BJ and Ahlstedt, S and Thomas, WR and Sly, PD and Holt, PG},
  issn         = {0903-1936},
  journal      = {EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL},
  keyword      = {bacteria,Staphylococcal enterotoxin,bronchial hyperresponsiveness,immunoglobulin E,NONTYPABLE HAEMOPHILUS-INFLUENZAE,ATOPIC-DERMATITIS,BRONCHIAL-ASTHMA,IMMUNOGLOBULIN-E,IL-10 PRODUCTION,IGE ANTIBODIES,HIGH-RISK,Raine study,Asthma,CHILDREN,DISEASE,STAPHYLOCOCCAL-ENTEROTOXIN-B},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {509--516},
  title        = {Th2-associated immunity to bacteria in teenagers and susceptibility to asthma},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1183/09031936.00184109},
  volume       = {36},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Hollams, Elysia M, BJ Hales, Claus Bachert, WOUTER HUVENNE, F Parsons, NH de Klerk, M Serralha, et al. 2010. “Th2-associated Immunity to Bacteria in Teenagers and Susceptibility to Asthma.” European Respiratory Journal 36 (3): 509–516.
APA
Hollams, E. M., Hales, B., Bachert, C., HUVENNE, W., Parsons, F., de Klerk, N., Serralha, M., et al. (2010). Th2-associated immunity to bacteria in teenagers and susceptibility to asthma. EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, 36(3), 509–516.
Vancouver
1.
Hollams EM, Hales B, Bachert C, HUVENNE W, Parsons F, de Klerk N, et al. Th2-associated immunity to bacteria in teenagers and susceptibility to asthma. EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL. 2010;36(3):509–16.
MLA
Hollams, Elysia M, BJ Hales, Claus Bachert, et al. “Th2-associated Immunity to Bacteria in Teenagers and Susceptibility to Asthma.” EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL 36.3 (2010): 509–516. Print.