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Resisting motor mimicry: control of imitation involves processes central to social cognition in patients with frontal and temporo-parietal lesions

Stephanie Spengler, D Yves von Cramon and Marcel Brass UGent (2010) SOCIAL NEUROSCIENCE. 5(4). p.401-416
abstract
Perception and execution of actions share a common representational and neural substrate and thereby facilitate unintentional motor mimicry. Controlling automatic imitation is therefore a crucial requirement of such a oshared representationalo system. Based on previous findings from neuroimaging, we suggest that resisting motor mimicry recruits the same underlying computational mechanisms also involved in higher-level social cognitive processing, such as self - other differentiation and the representation of mental states. The aim of the present study was to investigate on a behavioral level whether there is a functional association between the inhibition of imitation and tasks, assessing the understanding of mental states and of different perspectives of self and other. In a sample of neuropsychological patients with frontal lesions, a correlation between the ability for mental state attribution and the control of imitation was found, with a similar effect in the control group. Temporo-parietal lesioned patients showed a highly significant correlation between imitative control and visual and cognitive perspective-taking. Even after controlling for executive functions, the results remained significant, indicating the functional specificity of this relationship. These findings provide new insight into the functional processes underlying the control of shared representations and suggest a novel link between embodied and higher-level social cognition.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
MIND, LOBE DAMAGE, SHARED REPRESENTATIONS, MIRROR-NEURON, TEMPOROPARIETAL JUNCTION, NEURAL MECHANISMS, PERSPECTIVE-TAKING, CARD SORTING TEST, HUMAN PREFRONTAL CORTEX, ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX
journal title
SOCIAL NEUROSCIENCE
Soc. Neurosci.
volume
5
issue
4
pages
401 - 416
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000279966400007
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY
JCR impact factor
2.823 (2010)
JCR rank
19/72 (2010)
JCR quartile
2 (2010)
ISSN
1747-0919
DOI
10.1080/17470911003687905
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1030817
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1030817
date created
2010-08-31 17:12:17
date last changed
2017-09-28 09:05:52
@article{1030817,
  abstract     = {Perception and execution of actions share a common representational and neural substrate and thereby facilitate unintentional motor mimicry. Controlling automatic imitation is therefore a crucial requirement of such a oshared representationalo system. Based on previous findings from neuroimaging, we suggest that resisting motor mimicry recruits the same underlying computational mechanisms also involved in higher-level social cognitive processing, such as self - other differentiation and the representation of mental states. The aim of the present study was to investigate on a behavioral level whether there is a functional association between the inhibition of imitation and tasks, assessing the understanding of mental states and of different perspectives of self and other. In a sample of neuropsychological patients with frontal lesions, a correlation between the ability for mental state attribution and the control of imitation was found, with a similar effect in the control group. Temporo-parietal lesioned patients showed a highly significant correlation between imitative control and visual and cognitive perspective-taking. Even after controlling for executive functions, the results remained significant, indicating the functional specificity of this relationship. These findings provide new insight into the functional processes underlying the control of shared representations and suggest a novel link between embodied and higher-level social cognition.},
  author       = {Spengler, Stephanie and von Cramon, D Yves and Brass, Marcel},
  issn         = {1747-0919},
  journal      = {SOCIAL NEUROSCIENCE},
  keyword      = {MIND,LOBE DAMAGE,SHARED REPRESENTATIONS,MIRROR-NEURON,TEMPOROPARIETAL JUNCTION,NEURAL MECHANISMS,PERSPECTIVE-TAKING,CARD SORTING TEST,HUMAN PREFRONTAL CORTEX,ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {401--416},
  title        = {Resisting motor mimicry: control of imitation involves processes central to social cognition in patients with frontal and temporo-parietal lesions},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17470911003687905},
  volume       = {5},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Spengler, Stephanie, D Yves von Cramon, and Marcel Brass. 2010. “Resisting Motor Mimicry: Control of Imitation Involves Processes Central to Social Cognition in Patients with Frontal and Temporo-parietal Lesions.” Social Neuroscience 5 (4): 401–416.
APA
Spengler, Stephanie, von Cramon, D. Y., & Brass, M. (2010). Resisting motor mimicry: control of imitation involves processes central to social cognition in patients with frontal and temporo-parietal lesions. SOCIAL NEUROSCIENCE, 5(4), 401–416.
Vancouver
1.
Spengler S, von Cramon DY, Brass M. Resisting motor mimicry: control of imitation involves processes central to social cognition in patients with frontal and temporo-parietal lesions. SOCIAL NEUROSCIENCE. 2010;5(4):401–16.
MLA
Spengler, Stephanie, D Yves von Cramon, and Marcel Brass. “Resisting Motor Mimicry: Control of Imitation Involves Processes Central to Social Cognition in Patients with Frontal and Temporo-parietal Lesions.” SOCIAL NEUROSCIENCE 5.4 (2010): 401–416. Print.