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Abscisic acid deficiency causes changes in cuticle permeability and pectin composition that influence tomato resistance to Botrytis cinerea

Katrien Curvers UGent, Hamed Seifi UGent, Grégory Mouille, Riet De Rycke UGent, Bob Asselbergh UGent, Annelies Van Hecke UGent, Dieter Vanderschaeghe UGent, Herman R Höfte, Nico Callewaert UGent and Frank Van Breusegem UGent, et al. (2010) PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. 154(2). p.847-860
abstract
A mutant of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) with reduced abscisic acid (ABA) production (sitiens) exhibits increased resistance to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. This resistance is correlated with a rapid and strong hydrogen peroxide-driven cell wall fortification response in epidermis cells which is absent in tomato with normal ABA production. Moreover, basal expression of defense genes is higher in the mutant compared to the wild-type tomato. Given the importance of this fast response in sitiens resistance, we investigated cell wall and cuticle properties of the mutant at the chemical, histological and ultrastructural level. We demonstrate that ABA-deficiency in the mutant leads to increased cuticle permeability which is positively correlated with disease resistance. Furthermore, perturbation of ABA levels affects pectin composition. Sitiens plants have a relatively higher degree of pectin methylesterification and release different oligosaccharides upon inoculation with B. cinerea. These results show that endogenous plant ABA levels affect the composition of the tomato cuticle and cell wall and demonstrate the importance of cuticle and cell wall chemistry in shaping the outcome of this plant-fungus interaction.
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author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
CAPILLARY-ELECTROPHORESIS, PSEUDOMONAS-SYRINGAE, APPRESSORIUM FORMATION, SIGNAL-TRANSDUCTION, ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA, PLANT-PATHOGEN, F-SP HORDEI, EPIDERMAL-CELL DIFFERENTIATION, POLYGALACTURONASE-INHIBITING PROTEIN, LIPID-TRANSFER PROTEIN, aba, abscisic acid, plant defense response, permeability, cuticle, sitiens, Botrytis, Cell wall, tomato
journal title
PLANT PHYSIOLOGY
Plant Physiol.
volume
154
issue
2
pages
847 - 860
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000282512300057
JCR category
PLANT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
6.451 (2010)
JCR rank
8/185 (2010)
JCR quartile
1 (2010)
ISSN
0032-0889
DOI
10.1104/pp.110.158972
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
1030649
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1030649
date created
2010-08-31 15:00:20
date last changed
2012-06-26 14:32:06
@article{1030649,
  abstract     = {A mutant of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) with reduced abscisic acid (ABA) production (sitiens) exhibits increased resistance to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. This resistance is correlated with a rapid and strong hydrogen peroxide-driven cell wall fortification response in epidermis cells which is absent in tomato with normal ABA production. Moreover, basal expression of defense genes is higher in the mutant compared to the wild-type tomato. Given the importance of this fast response in sitiens resistance, we investigated cell wall and cuticle properties of the mutant at the chemical, histological and ultrastructural level. We demonstrate that ABA-deficiency in the mutant leads to increased cuticle permeability which is positively correlated with disease resistance. Furthermore, perturbation of ABA levels affects pectin composition. Sitiens plants have a relatively higher degree of pectin methylesterification and release different oligosaccharides upon inoculation with B. cinerea. These results show that endogenous plant ABA levels affect the composition of the tomato cuticle and cell wall and demonstrate the importance of cuticle and cell wall chemistry in shaping the outcome of this plant-fungus interaction.},
  author       = {Curvers, Katrien and Seifi, Hamed and Mouille, Gr{\'e}gory and De Rycke, Riet and Asselbergh, Bob and Van Hecke, Annelies and Vanderschaeghe, Dieter and H{\"o}fte, Herman R and Callewaert, Nico and Van Breusegem, Frank and H{\"o}fte, Monica},
  issn         = {0032-0889},
  journal      = {PLANT PHYSIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {CAPILLARY-ELECTROPHORESIS,PSEUDOMONAS-SYRINGAE,APPRESSORIUM FORMATION,SIGNAL-TRANSDUCTION,ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA,PLANT-PATHOGEN,F-SP HORDEI,EPIDERMAL-CELL DIFFERENTIATION,POLYGALACTURONASE-INHIBITING PROTEIN,LIPID-TRANSFER PROTEIN,aba,abscisic acid,plant defense response,permeability,cuticle,sitiens,Botrytis,Cell wall,tomato},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {847--860},
  title        = {Abscisic acid deficiency causes changes in cuticle permeability and pectin composition that influence tomato resistance to Botrytis cinerea},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1104/pp.110.158972},
  volume       = {154},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Curvers, Katrien, Hamed Seifi, Grégory Mouille, Riet De Rycke, Bob Asselbergh, Annelies Van Hecke, Dieter Vanderschaeghe, et al. 2010. “Abscisic Acid Deficiency Causes Changes in Cuticle Permeability and Pectin Composition That Influence Tomato Resistance to Botrytis Cinerea.” Plant Physiology 154 (2): 847–860.
APA
Curvers, K., Seifi, H., Mouille, G., De Rycke, R., Asselbergh, B., Van Hecke, A., Vanderschaeghe, D., et al. (2010). Abscisic acid deficiency causes changes in cuticle permeability and pectin composition that influence tomato resistance to Botrytis cinerea. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY, 154(2), 847–860.
Vancouver
1.
Curvers K, Seifi H, Mouille G, De Rycke R, Asselbergh B, Van Hecke A, et al. Abscisic acid deficiency causes changes in cuticle permeability and pectin composition that influence tomato resistance to Botrytis cinerea. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. 2010;154(2):847–60.
MLA
Curvers, Katrien, Hamed Seifi, Grégory Mouille, et al. “Abscisic Acid Deficiency Causes Changes in Cuticle Permeability and Pectin Composition That Influence Tomato Resistance to Botrytis Cinerea.” PLANT PHYSIOLOGY 154.2 (2010): 847–860. Print.