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Designated terrorists: the Kurdistan workers' party and its struggle to (re)gain political legitimacy

Marlies Casier UGent (2010) MEDITERRANEAN POLITICS. 15(3). p.393-413
abstract
The European Union designation of the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) as an international terrorist organization has led to a profound distrust of the EU on the part of the PKK. This has resulted in a perception that the Kurdish organization has turned against the EU and withdrawn its support for Turkey's accession. The PKK activities and viewpoints as presented and discussed in this article, however, indicate that this is not the case. Politically squeezed at home and sidelined abroad, it is argued, the PKK is, in fact, primarily concerned to (re)gain recognition as a representative of Turkey's Kurds (upon which it is making its support for Turkey's accession conditional).
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Kurdish Question, War on Terror, Kurdistan Workers' Party, Turkey-EU accession negotiations
journal title
MEDITERRANEAN POLITICS
Mediterr. Polit.
volume
15
issue
3
pages
393 - 413
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000284411700003
JCR category
POLITICAL SCIENCE
JCR impact factor
0.559 (2010)
JCR rank
81/139 (2010)
JCR quartile
3 (2010)
ISSN
1362-9395
DOI
10.1080/13629395.2010.517105
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1029474
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1029474
date created
2010-08-27 14:04:46
date last changed
2011-07-08 13:21:56
@article{1029474,
  abstract     = {The European Union designation of the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) as an international terrorist organization has led to a profound distrust of the EU on the part of the PKK. This has resulted in a perception that the Kurdish organization has turned against the EU and withdrawn its support for Turkey's accession. The PKK activities and viewpoints as presented and discussed in this article, however, indicate that this is not the case. Politically squeezed at home and sidelined abroad, it is argued, the PKK is, in fact, primarily concerned to (re)gain recognition as a representative of Turkey's Kurds (upon which it is making its support for Turkey's accession conditional).},
  author       = {Casier, Marlies},
  issn         = {1362-9395},
  journal      = {MEDITERRANEAN POLITICS},
  keyword      = {Kurdish Question,War on Terror,Kurdistan Workers' Party,Turkey-EU accession negotiations},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {393--413},
  title        = {Designated terrorists: the Kurdistan workers' party and its struggle to (re)gain political legitimacy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13629395.2010.517105},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Casier, Marlies. 2010. “Designated Terrorists: The Kurdistan Workers’ Party and Its Struggle to (re)gain Political Legitimacy.” Mediterranean Politics 15 (3): 393–413.
APA
Casier, M. (2010). Designated terrorists: the Kurdistan workers’ party and its struggle to (re)gain political legitimacy. MEDITERRANEAN POLITICS, 15(3), 393–413.
Vancouver
1.
Casier M. Designated terrorists: the Kurdistan workers’ party and its struggle to (re)gain political legitimacy. MEDITERRANEAN POLITICS. 2010;15(3):393–413.
MLA
Casier, Marlies. “Designated Terrorists: The Kurdistan Workers’ Party and Its Struggle to (re)gain Political Legitimacy.” MEDITERRANEAN POLITICS 15.3 (2010): 393–413. Print.