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HtpG and STM4067 contribute to long-term Salmonella Typhimurium persistence in pigs

Alexander Van Parys UGent, Filip Boyen UGent, Elin Verbrugghe UGent, Bregje Leyman UGent, Freddy Haesebrouck UGent and Frank Pasmans UGent (2010) International Pig Veterinary Society Congress, 21st, Posters.
abstract
Persistent Salmonella Typhimurium infections in pigs often result in asymptomatic carrier pigs and are a major concern for food safety and human health. Tonsils and lymph nodes play a key role in the persistence of Salmonella Typhimurium in pigs, but very little is known about the underlying mechanisms. After bacterial invasion in pigs, the porcine immune system will respond to clear the Salmonella infection and bacterial survival strategies for (long-)term persistence will become important. For the identification of Salmonella Typhimurium genes specifically induced in tonsils and lymph nodes at 3 weeks post inoculation, a genome-wide screening method was performed using in vivo expression technology (IVET). Using IVET we were able to identify different Salmonella Typhimurium genes that play a role in long-term persistence in pigs. Furthermore, we were able to show a role for Salmonella Typhimurium genes htpG (encoding a heat-shock protein) and STM4067 (encoding a protein with an unknown function) in long-term persistence in the porcine intestines and lymph nodes, although their exact role remains to be clarified.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
in
International Pig Veterinary Society Congress, 21st, Posters
conference name
21st International Pig Veterinary Society Congress (IPVS 2010)
conference location
Vancouver, BC, Canada
conference start
2010-07-18
conference end
2010-07-21
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C3
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
1014860
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1014860
date created
2010-07-28 11:37:15
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:35:33
@inproceedings{1014860,
  abstract     = {Persistent Salmonella Typhimurium infections in pigs often result in asymptomatic carrier pigs and are a major concern for food safety and human health. Tonsils and lymph nodes play a key role in the persistence of Salmonella Typhimurium in pigs, but very little is known about the underlying mechanisms. After bacterial invasion in pigs, the porcine immune system will respond to clear the Salmonella infection and bacterial survival strategies for (long-)term persistence will become important. For the identification of Salmonella Typhimurium genes specifically induced in tonsils and lymph nodes at 3 weeks post inoculation, a genome-wide screening method was performed using in vivo expression technology (IVET).
Using IVET we were able to identify different Salmonella Typhimurium genes that play a role in long-term persistence in pigs. Furthermore, we were able to show a role for Salmonella Typhimurium genes htpG (encoding a heat-shock protein) and STM4067 (encoding a protein with an unknown function) in long-term persistence in the porcine intestines and lymph nodes, although their exact role remains to be clarified.},
  author       = {Van Parys, Alexander and Boyen, Filip and Verbrugghe, Elin and Leyman, Bregje and Haesebrouck, Freddy and Pasmans, Frank},
  booktitle    = {International Pig Veterinary Society Congress, 21st, Posters},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Vancouver, BC, Canada},
  title        = {HtpG and STM4067 contribute to long-term Salmonella Typhimurium persistence in pigs},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Van Parys, Alexander, Filip Boyen, Elin Verbrugghe, Bregje Leyman, Freddy Haesebrouck, and Frank Pasmans. 2010. “HtpG and STM4067 Contribute to Long-term Salmonella Typhimurium Persistence in Pigs.” In International Pig Veterinary Society Congress, 21st, Posters.
APA
Van Parys, A., Boyen, F., Verbrugghe, E., Leyman, B., Haesebrouck, F., & Pasmans, F. (2010). HtpG and STM4067 contribute to long-term Salmonella Typhimurium persistence in pigs. International Pig Veterinary Society Congress, 21st, Posters. Presented at the 21st International Pig Veterinary Society Congress (IPVS 2010).
Vancouver
1.
Van Parys A, Boyen F, Verbrugghe E, Leyman B, Haesebrouck F, Pasmans F. HtpG and STM4067 contribute to long-term Salmonella Typhimurium persistence in pigs. International Pig Veterinary Society Congress, 21st, Posters. 2010.
MLA
Van Parys, Alexander, Filip Boyen, Elin Verbrugghe, et al. “HtpG and STM4067 Contribute to Long-term Salmonella Typhimurium Persistence in Pigs.” International Pig Veterinary Society Congress, 21st, Posters. 2010. Print.