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Nuclear medicine: investigation of renal function in small animal medicine

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Abstract
Kidney function investigations in veterinary medicine are traditionally based on blood analysis (blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine concentration) and / or urinalysis (urine specific gravity, protein-to-creatinine ratio or fractional excretion). Morphologic information is usually obtained by abdominal radiography or ultrasonography. However, when more specific information on the functionality of the kidneys is needed, nuclear medicine offers various tracers that specifically represent glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow or functional renal mass, sometimes combining functional and morphologic data. These procedures can be based on blood sampling techniques (non-imaging methods), or data can be obtained using a gamma-camera (imaging methods). The most commonly used radionuclides for the examination of kidney function in small animal medicine are discussed in this review.
Keywords
NORMAL CATS, SCINTIGRAPHIC DETERMINATION, GLOMERULAR-FILTRATION-RATE, TC-99M-DIETHYLENETRIAMINEPENTACETIC ACID DTPA, DIAMINE TETRAACETIC ACID, PLASMA-CLEARANCE, NORMAL DOGS, CREATININE, IOHEXOL, HYPERTHYROIDISM

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Citation

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Chicago
Vandermeulen, Eva, Carlos De Sadeleer, André Dobbeleir, Hamphrey Ham, Simon Vermeire, Henri van Bree, Guido Slegers, and Kathelijne Peremans. 2011. “Nuclear Medicine: Investigation of Renal Function in Small Animal Medicine.” Vlaams Diergeneeskundig Tijdschrift 80 (2): 105–114.
APA
Vandermeulen, Eva, De Sadeleer, C., Dobbeleir, A., Ham, H., Vermeire, S., van Bree, H., Slegers, G., et al. (2011). Nuclear medicine: investigation of renal function in small animal medicine. VLAAMS DIERGENEESKUNDIG TIJDSCHRIFT, 80(2), 105–114.
Vancouver
1.
Vandermeulen E, De Sadeleer C, Dobbeleir A, Ham H, Vermeire S, van Bree H, et al. Nuclear medicine: investigation of renal function in small animal medicine. VLAAMS DIERGENEESKUNDIG TIJDSCHRIFT. 2011;80(2):105–14.
MLA
Vandermeulen, Eva, Carlos De Sadeleer, André Dobbeleir, et al. “Nuclear Medicine: Investigation of Renal Function in Small Animal Medicine.” VLAAMS DIERGENEESKUNDIG TIJDSCHRIFT 80.2 (2011): 105–114. Print.
@article{1012983,
  abstract     = {Kidney function investigations in veterinary medicine are traditionally based on blood analysis (blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine concentration) and / or urinalysis (urine specific gravity, protein-to-creatinine ratio or fractional excretion). Morphologic information is usually obtained by abdominal radiography or ultrasonography. However, when more specific information on the functionality of the kidneys is needed, nuclear medicine offers various tracers that specifically represent glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow or functional renal mass, sometimes combining functional and morphologic data. These procedures can be based on blood sampling techniques (non-imaging methods), or data can be obtained using a gamma-camera (imaging methods). The most commonly used radionuclides for the examination of kidney function in small animal medicine are discussed in this review.},
  author       = {Vandermeulen, Eva and De Sadeleer, Carlos and Dobbeleir, Andr{\'e}  and Ham, Hamphrey and Vermeire, Simon and van Bree, Henri and Slegers, Guido and Peremans, Kathelijne},
  issn         = {0303-9021},
  journal      = {VLAAMS DIERGENEESKUNDIG TIJDSCHRIFT},
  keyword      = {NORMAL CATS,SCINTIGRAPHIC DETERMINATION,GLOMERULAR-FILTRATION-RATE,TC-99M-DIETHYLENETRIAMINEPENTACETIC ACID DTPA,DIAMINE TETRAACETIC ACID,PLASMA-CLEARANCE,NORMAL DOGS,CREATININE,IOHEXOL,HYPERTHYROIDISM},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {105--114},
  title        = {Nuclear medicine: investigation of renal function in small animal medicine},
  url          = {http://vdt.ugent.be/code/showupload.php?id=639},
  volume       = {80},
  year         = {2011},
}

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