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Not all job demands are equal: differentiating job hindrances and job challenges in the Job Demands-Resources model

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Abstract
This study aimed to integrate the differentiation between two types of job demands, as made in previous studies, in the Job-Demands Resources (JD-R) model. Specifically, this study aimed to examine empirically whether the differentiation between job hindrances and job challenges, next to the category of job resources, accounts for the unexpected positive relationships between particular types of job demands (e.g., workload) and employees' work engagement. Results of confirmatory factor analyses supported the differentiation between the three categories of job characteristics in two samples (N1=261 and N2=441). Further, structural equation modelling confirmed the hypotheses that job hindrances associate positively with exhaustion (i.e., the main component of burnout) and negatively with vigour (i.e., the main component of work engagement). Job resources displayed the reversed pattern of relations. Job challenges were positively related to vigour. Rather unexpectedly, they were unrelated to exhaustion. Based on these findings, we discuss the importance of the differentiation between different types of job demands in the JD-R model for both theory and practice.
Keywords
DECISION LATITUDE, WORK ENGAGEMENT, BURNOUT, PERFORMANCE, QUESTIONNAIRE, BEHAVIOR, STRESS, STRAIN, NEED, INTERFERENCE, Burnout, Engagement, Job Demands-Resources model, Job challenges, Job hindrances

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Citation

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MLA
Van den Broeck, Anja et al. “Not All Job Demands Are Equal: Differentiating Job Hindrances and Job Challenges in the Job Demands-Resources Model.” EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF WORK AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 19.6 (2010): 735–759. Print.
APA
Van den Broeck, A., Decuyper, N., De Witte, H., & Vansteenkiste, M. (2010). Not all job demands are equal: differentiating job hindrances and job challenges in the Job Demands-Resources model. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF WORK AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY, 19(6), 735–759.
Chicago author-date
Van den Broeck, Anja, Nele Decuyper, Hans De Witte, and Maarten Vansteenkiste. 2010. “Not All Job Demands Are Equal: Differentiating Job Hindrances and Job Challenges in the Job Demands-Resources Model.” European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology 19 (6): 735–759.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Van den Broeck, Anja, Nele Decuyper, Hans De Witte, and Maarten Vansteenkiste. 2010. “Not All Job Demands Are Equal: Differentiating Job Hindrances and Job Challenges in the Job Demands-Resources Model.” European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology 19 (6): 735–759.
Vancouver
1.
Van den Broeck A, Decuyper N, De Witte H, Vansteenkiste M. Not all job demands are equal: differentiating job hindrances and job challenges in the Job Demands-Resources model. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF WORK AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. 2010;19(6):735–59.
IEEE
[1]
A. Van den Broeck, N. Decuyper, H. De Witte, and M. Vansteenkiste, “Not all job demands are equal: differentiating job hindrances and job challenges in the Job Demands-Resources model,” EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF WORK AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY, vol. 19, no. 6, pp. 735–759, 2010.
@article{1007317,
  abstract     = {This study aimed to integrate the differentiation between two types of job demands, as made in previous studies, in the Job-Demands Resources (JD-R) model. Specifically, this study aimed to examine empirically whether the differentiation between job hindrances and job challenges, next to the category of job resources, accounts for the unexpected positive relationships between particular types of job demands (e.g., workload) and employees' work engagement. Results of confirmatory factor analyses supported the differentiation between the three categories of job characteristics in two samples (N1=261 and N2=441). Further, structural equation modelling confirmed the hypotheses that job hindrances associate positively with exhaustion (i.e., the main component of burnout) and negatively with vigour (i.e., the main component of work engagement). Job resources displayed the reversed pattern of relations. Job challenges were positively related to vigour. Rather unexpectedly, they were unrelated to exhaustion. Based on these findings, we discuss the importance of the differentiation between different types of job demands in the JD-R model for both theory and practice.},
  author       = {Van den Broeck, Anja and Decuyper, Nele and De Witte, Hans and Vansteenkiste, Maarten},
  issn         = {1359-432X},
  journal      = {EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF WORK AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY},
  keywords     = {DECISION LATITUDE,WORK ENGAGEMENT,BURNOUT,PERFORMANCE,QUESTIONNAIRE,BEHAVIOR,STRESS,STRAIN,NEED,INTERFERENCE,Burnout,Engagement,Job Demands-Resources model,Job challenges,Job hindrances},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {735--759},
  title        = {Not all job demands are equal: differentiating job hindrances and job challenges in the Job Demands-Resources model},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13594320903223839},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2010},
}

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