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A revised hypothesis on the evolutionary origin of the vertebrate dentition

Ann Huysseune UGent, J-Y Sire and Paul Witten UGent (2010) JOURNAL OF APPLIED ICHTHYOLOGY. 26(2). p.152-155
abstract
Despite claims to the contrary, the evolutionary origin of teeth has not been definitely established. The classical 'outside in' theory stating that teeth derive from odontodes that invaded the oral cavity in conjunction with the origin of jaws has been challenged by an alternative, 'inside out', hypothesis suggesting that teeth evolved from pharyngeal denticles, as endodermal derivatives, prior to the origin of jaws. We propose a third scenario, a revised 'outside in' hypothesis (Huysseune et al., 2009). Our hypothesis is consistent with the current data and avoids speculations about convergent tooth evolution. We suggest that teeth may indeed have arisen before the origin of jaws, a pillar of the 'inside out' hypothesis, but not from the endodermally lined posterior pharynx. Rather, teeth would have been the result of competent, odontode-forming ectoderm invading the oropharyngeal cavity through the mouth as well as through the gill slits, interacting with neural-crest derived mesenchyme. Arguments in support of this hypothesis are: (i) the observation that pharyngeal teeth are present only in species known to possess gill slits, and disappear from the pharyngeal region in early tetrapods concomitant with the closure of gill slits; (ii) the assumption that endoderm alone, together with neural crest, cannot form teeth; (iii) observations on pharyngeal tooth and gill slit formation in extant species; (iv) the observation that the dental lamina (sensu Reif, 1982) is not a prerequisite for tooth formation; (v) evidence that patterning does not distinguish pharyngeal from skin denticles, and (vi) the observation on zebrafish mutants affected in the dermal skeleton. This 'modified outside in' hypothesis can be tested both on paleontological data (it predicts a correlation of the presence of pharyngeal teeth and of gill slits), and on developmental data in extant species (it predicts the necessity of an ectodermal signal to make [pharyngeal] teeth).
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
JAW, DENTICLES, FISH, REPLACEMENT, TEETH, PATTERNS
journal title
JOURNAL OF APPLIED ICHTHYOLOGY
J. Appl. Ichthyol.
editor
Paul Witten UGent, Ann Huysseune UGent, Harald Rosenthal and M. Leonor Cancela
volume
26
issue
2
issue title
Proceedings of the first International Workshop 'Interdisciplinary Approaches in Fish Skeletal Biology'
pages
152 - 155
conference name
Interdisciplinary Approaches in Fish Skeletal Biology
conference location
Tavira, Portugal
conference start
2009-04-27
conference end
2009-04-29
Web of Science type
Review
Web of Science id
000276655800003
JCR category
FISHERIES
JCR impact factor
0.945 (2010)
JCR rank
26/46 (2010)
JCR quartile
3 (2010)
ISSN
0175-8659
DOI
10.1111/j.1439-0426.2010.01395.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1002314
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1002314
date created
2010-07-05 12:25:21
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:42:12
@article{1002314,
  abstract     = {Despite claims to the contrary, the evolutionary origin of teeth has not been definitely established. The classical 'outside in' theory stating that teeth derive from odontodes that invaded the oral cavity in conjunction with the origin of jaws has been challenged by an alternative, 'inside out', hypothesis suggesting that teeth evolved from pharyngeal denticles, as endodermal derivatives, prior to the origin of jaws. We propose a third scenario, a revised 'outside in' hypothesis (Huysseune et al., 2009). Our hypothesis is consistent with the current data and avoids speculations about convergent tooth evolution. We suggest that teeth may indeed have arisen before the origin of jaws, a pillar of the 'inside out' hypothesis, but not from the endodermally lined posterior pharynx. Rather, teeth would have been the result of competent, odontode-forming ectoderm invading the oropharyngeal cavity through the mouth as well as through the gill slits, interacting with neural-crest derived mesenchyme. Arguments in support of this hypothesis are: (i) the observation that pharyngeal teeth are present only in species known to possess gill slits, and disappear from the pharyngeal region in early tetrapods concomitant with the closure of gill slits; (ii) the assumption that endoderm alone, together with neural crest, cannot form teeth; (iii) observations on pharyngeal tooth and gill slit formation in extant species; (iv) the observation that the dental lamina (sensu Reif, 1982) is not a prerequisite for tooth formation; (v) evidence that patterning does not distinguish pharyngeal from skin denticles, and (vi) the observation on zebrafish mutants affected in the dermal skeleton. This 'modified outside in' hypothesis can be tested both on paleontological data (it predicts a correlation of the presence of pharyngeal teeth and of gill slits), and on developmental data in extant species (it predicts the necessity of an ectodermal signal to make [pharyngeal] teeth).},
  author       = {Huysseune, Ann and Sire, J-Y and Witten, Paul},
  editor       = {Witten, Paul and Huysseune, Ann and Rosenthal, Harald and Cancela, M. Leonor},
  issn         = {0175-8659},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF APPLIED ICHTHYOLOGY},
  keyword      = {JAW,DENTICLES,FISH,REPLACEMENT,TEETH,PATTERNS},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Tavira, Portugal},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {152--155},
  title        = {A revised hypothesis on the evolutionary origin of the vertebrate dentition},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0426.2010.01395.x},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Huysseune, Ann, J-Y Sire, and Paul Witten. 2010. “A Revised Hypothesis on the Evolutionary Origin of the Vertebrate Dentition.” Ed. Paul Witten, Ann Huysseune, Harald Rosenthal, and M. Leonor Cancela. Journal of Applied Ichthyology 26 (2): 152–155.
APA
Huysseune, A., Sire, J.-Y., & Witten, P. (2010). A revised hypothesis on the evolutionary origin of the vertebrate dentition. (P. Witten, A. Huysseune, H. Rosenthal, & M. L. Cancela, Eds.)JOURNAL OF APPLIED ICHTHYOLOGY, 26(2), 152–155. Presented at the Interdisciplinary Approaches in Fish Skeletal Biology.
Vancouver
1.
Huysseune A, Sire J-Y, Witten P. A revised hypothesis on the evolutionary origin of the vertebrate dentition. Witten P, Huysseune A, Rosenthal H, Cancela ML, editors. JOURNAL OF APPLIED ICHTHYOLOGY. 2010;26(2):152–5.
MLA
Huysseune, Ann, J-Y Sire, and Paul Witten. “A Revised Hypothesis on the Evolutionary Origin of the Vertebrate Dentition.” Ed. Paul Witten et al. JOURNAL OF APPLIED ICHTHYOLOGY 26.2 (2010): 152–155. Print.