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Nurses' practices in pharmacotherapy and their association with educational level

TINNE DILLES, Robert Vander Stichele UGent, Bart Van Rompaey, Lucas Van Bortel and Monique Elseviers (2010) JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING. 66(5). p.1072-1079
abstract
Aim: This paper is a report of a study of the association between educational level and nurses' practices in pharmacotherapeutic activities in three clinical settings. Background: The preparation and administration of medication are at the core of nursing practice, and nurses' involvement in pharmacotherapy is essential to medication safety. Nursing strategies to improve patient adherence to treatment and to identify adverse drug reactions have been described, but nurses' practice patterns in monitoring adherence and adverse drug reactions remain undocumented. Methods: A cross-sectional correlational survey design was used. Data were collected between 2005 and 2007. Each year, the focus was on a different setting. Nurses were selected by convenience sampling: 260 worked in nursing homes, 82 in community care services and 1070 in hospitals. Questions focused on the provision of medication information, observation of patient medication adherence and identification of adverse drug reactions during the preceding month. Results: Involvement in providing drug information varied considerably, from 50% among hospital nurses to 82% among nurses in community care services. Statistically significantly fewer nurses observed non-adherence in hospitals (50%) than in the other settings (about 80%). Between 40% and 49% of the nurses had observed an adverse drug reaction. Nurses' information-seeking behaviour and problem responses also varied according to setting. Bachelor's degree holders were 35% more likely than diploma holders to have observed an adverse drug reaction. Conclusion: Nurses assume considerable pharmacotherapeutic responsibilities. Practice patterns are codetermined by the healthcare setting and nurses' educational level.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
questionnaire, acute care facility, pharmacotherapy, nursing home, educational level, nursing
journal title
JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING
J. Adv. Nurs.
volume
66
issue
5
pages
1072 - 1079
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000276246800013
JCR category
NURSING
JCR impact factor
1.54 (2010)
JCR rank
9/85 (2010)
JCR quartile
1 (2010)
ISSN
0309-2402
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2648.2010.05268.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
1000349
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-1000349
date created
2010-07-01 14:57:32
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:42:12
@article{1000349,
  abstract     = {Aim: This paper is a report of a study of the association between educational level and nurses' practices in pharmacotherapeutic activities in three clinical settings.
Background: The preparation and administration of medication are at the core of nursing practice, and nurses' involvement in pharmacotherapy is essential to medication safety. Nursing strategies to improve patient adherence to treatment and to identify adverse drug reactions have been described, but nurses' practice patterns in monitoring adherence and adverse drug reactions remain undocumented.
Methods: A cross-sectional correlational survey design was used. Data were collected between 2005 and 2007. Each year, the focus was on a different setting. Nurses were selected by convenience sampling: 260 worked in nursing homes, 82 in community care services and 1070 in hospitals. Questions focused on the provision of medication information, observation of patient medication adherence and identification of adverse drug reactions during the preceding month.
Results: Involvement in providing drug information varied considerably, from 50\% among hospital nurses to 82\% among nurses in community care services. Statistically significantly fewer nurses observed non-adherence in hospitals (50\%) than in the other settings (about 80\%). Between 40\% and 49\% of the nurses had observed an adverse drug reaction. Nurses' information-seeking behaviour and problem responses also varied according to setting. Bachelor's degree holders were 35\% more likely than diploma holders to have observed an adverse drug reaction.
Conclusion: Nurses assume considerable pharmacotherapeutic responsibilities. Practice patterns are codetermined by the healthcare setting and nurses' educational level.},
  author       = {DILLES, TINNE and Vander Stichele, Robert and Van Rompaey, Bart and Van Bortel, Lucas and Elseviers, Monique},
  issn         = {0309-2402},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING},
  keyword      = {questionnaire,acute care facility,pharmacotherapy,nursing home,educational level,nursing},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1072--1079},
  title        = {Nurses' practices in pharmacotherapy and their association with educational level},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2648.2010.05268.x},
  volume       = {66},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
DILLES, TINNE, Robert Vander Stichele, Bart Van Rompaey, Lucas Van Bortel, and Monique Elseviers. 2010. “Nurses’ Practices in Pharmacotherapy and Their Association with Educational Level.” Journal of Advanced Nursing 66 (5): 1072–1079.
APA
DILLES, T., Vander Stichele, R., Van Rompaey, B., Van Bortel, L., & Elseviers, M. (2010). Nurses’ practices in pharmacotherapy and their association with educational level. JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, 66(5), 1072–1079.
Vancouver
1.
DILLES T, Vander Stichele R, Van Rompaey B, Van Bortel L, Elseviers M. Nurses’ practices in pharmacotherapy and their association with educational level. JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING. 2010;66(5):1072–9.
MLA
DILLES, TINNE, Robert Vander Stichele, Bart Van Rompaey, et al. “Nurses’ Practices in Pharmacotherapy and Their Association with Educational Level.” JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING 66.5 (2010): 1072–1079. Print.