Advanced search
1 file | 2.99 MB Add to list

Cell death as an architect of adult skin stem cell niches

Kim Lecomte (UGent) , Annagiada Toniolo (UGent) and Esther Hoste (UGent)
Author
Organization
Project
Abstract
Our skin provides a physical and immunological barrier against dehydration and environmental insults ranging from microbial attacks, toxins and UV irradiation to wounding. Proper functioning of the skin barrier largely depends on the interplay between keratinocytes- the epithelial cells of the skin- and immune cells. Two spatially distinct populations of keratinocyte stem cells (SCs) maintain the epidermal barrier function and the hair follicle. These SCs are inherently long-lived, but cell death can occur within their niches and impacts their functionality. The default cell death programme in skin is apoptosis, an orderly and non-inflammatory suicide programme. However, recent findings are shedding light on the significance of various modes of regulated necrotic cell death, which are lytic and can provoke inflammation within the local skin environment. While the presence of dying cells was generally regarded as a mere consequence of inflammation, findings in various human dermatological conditions and experimental mouse models of aberrant cell death control demonstrated that cell death programmes in keratinocytes (KCs) can drive skin inflammation and even tumour initiation. When cells die, they need to be removed by phagocytosis and KCs can function as non-professional phagocytes of apoptotic cells with important implications for their SC capacities. It is becoming apparent that in conditions of heightened SC activity, distinct cell death modalities differentially impact the different skin SC populations in their local niches. Here, we describe how regulated cell death modalities functionally affect epidermal SC niches along with their relevance to injury repair, inflammatory skin disorders and cancer.

Downloads

  • 5136 24Lecomte.pdf
    • full text (Published version)
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 2.99 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Lecomte, Kim, et al. “Cell Death as an Architect of Adult Skin Stem Cell Niches.” CELL DEATH AND DIFFERENTIATION, 2024, doi:10.1038/s41418-024-01297-3.
APA
Lecomte, K., Toniolo, A., & Hoste, E. (2024). Cell death as an architect of adult skin stem cell niches. CELL DEATH AND DIFFERENTIATION. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41418-024-01297-3
Chicago author-date
Lecomte, Kim, Annagiada Toniolo, and Esther Hoste. 2024. “Cell Death as an Architect of Adult Skin Stem Cell Niches.” CELL DEATH AND DIFFERENTIATION. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41418-024-01297-3.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Lecomte, Kim, Annagiada Toniolo, and Esther Hoste. 2024. “Cell Death as an Architect of Adult Skin Stem Cell Niches.” CELL DEATH AND DIFFERENTIATION. doi:10.1038/s41418-024-01297-3.
Vancouver
1.
Lecomte K, Toniolo A, Hoste E. Cell death as an architect of adult skin stem cell niches. CELL DEATH AND DIFFERENTIATION. 2024;
IEEE
[1]
K. Lecomte, A. Toniolo, and E. Hoste, “Cell death as an architect of adult skin stem cell niches,” CELL DEATH AND DIFFERENTIATION, 2024.
@article{01HYJW4YYZRC1G4GYVNXAC8SSQ,
  abstract     = {{Our skin provides a physical and immunological barrier against dehydration and environmental insults ranging from microbial attacks, toxins and UV irradiation to wounding. Proper functioning of the skin barrier largely depends on the interplay between keratinocytes- the epithelial cells of the skin- and immune cells. Two spatially distinct populations of keratinocyte stem cells (SCs) maintain the epidermal barrier function and the hair follicle. These SCs are inherently long-lived, but cell death can occur within their niches and impacts their functionality. The default cell death programme in skin is apoptosis, an orderly and non-inflammatory suicide programme. However, recent findings are shedding light on the significance of various modes of regulated necrotic cell death, which are lytic and can provoke inflammation within the local skin environment. While the presence of dying cells was generally regarded as a mere consequence of inflammation, findings in various human dermatological conditions and experimental mouse models of aberrant cell death control demonstrated that cell death programmes in keratinocytes (KCs) can drive skin inflammation and even tumour initiation. When cells die, they need to be removed by phagocytosis and KCs can function as non-professional phagocytes of apoptotic cells with important implications for their SC capacities. It is becoming apparent that in conditions of heightened SC activity, distinct cell death modalities differentially impact the different skin SC populations in their local niches. Here, we describe how regulated cell death modalities functionally affect epidermal SC niches along with their relevance to injury repair, inflammatory skin disorders and cancer.}},
  author       = {{Lecomte, Kim and Toniolo, Annagiada and Hoste, Esther}},
  issn         = {{1350-9047}},
  journal      = {{CELL DEATH AND DIFFERENTIATION}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  title        = {{Cell death as an architect of adult skin stem cell niches}},
  url          = {{http://doi.org/10.1038/s41418-024-01297-3}},
  year         = {{2024}},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: