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Revolutionary debtscapes : domestic territories of contestation in Tunisia

Lana Salman (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
How are poor women politicized in the post-revolution city? I highlight women's everyday experiences of homemaking, where the intimacy of the home shaped through debt becomes a terrain of politicization that spills outside the confines of domestic spaces. Connecting the literature on popular city-making in the Middle East and North Africa with the literature on social reproduction and microfinance debt, I draw on an ethnography of microlending in Tunisia's popular neighborhoods to show poor women's grievances and their political outcomes. I argue that for women who live in and build these spaces, homemaking through microfinance debt is both dispossessive and politicizing because it makes more visible grievances born within the domestic enclosure of the home. Through the social reproductive labor of homemaking, these women understand themselves as right-bearing citizens. I build on the concepts of 'debtscapes' (Roy 2010) and 'domestic territories' (Gago 2020) to show that homemaking through debt is a space for articulating grievances about unjust cities and underserviced neighborhoods. The article identifies two mechanisms of politicization: organizing for better service delivery and developing oppositional attitudes towards local governments. Together, these mechanisms elevate poor women's experiences and reintegrate their biographies into conceptualizations of what counts as politics in the post-revolution city.
Keywords
Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous), Cultural Studies, Demography, Gender Studies, Contestation, debt, popular neighbourhoods, post-revolution Tunisia, social reproduction, MICROFINANCE, POLITICS, GENDER

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Salman, Lana. “Revolutionary Debtscapes : Domestic Territories of Contestation in Tunisia.” GENDER PLACE AND CULTURE, 2024, pp. 1–20, doi:10.1080/0966369x.2023.2280747.
APA
Salman, L. (2024). Revolutionary debtscapes : domestic territories of contestation in Tunisia. GENDER PLACE AND CULTURE, 1–20. https://doi.org/10.1080/0966369x.2023.2280747
Chicago author-date
Salman, Lana. 2024. “Revolutionary Debtscapes : Domestic Territories of Contestation in Tunisia.” GENDER PLACE AND CULTURE, 1–20. https://doi.org/10.1080/0966369x.2023.2280747.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Salman, Lana. 2024. “Revolutionary Debtscapes : Domestic Territories of Contestation in Tunisia.” GENDER PLACE AND CULTURE: 1–20. doi:10.1080/0966369x.2023.2280747.
Vancouver
1.
Salman L. Revolutionary debtscapes : domestic territories of contestation in Tunisia. GENDER PLACE AND CULTURE. 2024;1–20.
IEEE
[1]
L. Salman, “Revolutionary debtscapes : domestic territories of contestation in Tunisia,” GENDER PLACE AND CULTURE, pp. 1–20, 2024.
@article{01HRW0005NM5VXXYSTQZV5K7P9,
  abstract     = {{How are poor women politicized in the post-revolution city? I highlight women's everyday experiences of homemaking, where the intimacy of the home shaped through debt becomes a terrain of politicization that spills outside the confines of domestic spaces. Connecting the literature on popular city-making in the Middle East and North Africa with the literature on social reproduction and microfinance debt, I draw on an ethnography of microlending in Tunisia's popular neighborhoods to show poor women's grievances and their political outcomes. I argue that for women who live in and build these spaces, homemaking through microfinance debt is both dispossessive and politicizing because it makes more visible grievances born within the domestic enclosure of the home. Through the social reproductive labor of homemaking, these women understand themselves as right-bearing citizens. I build on the concepts of 'debtscapes' (Roy 2010) and 'domestic territories' (Gago 2020) to show that homemaking through debt is a space for articulating grievances about unjust cities and underserviced neighborhoods. The article identifies two mechanisms of politicization: organizing for better service delivery and developing oppositional attitudes towards local governments. Together, these mechanisms elevate poor women's experiences and reintegrate their biographies into conceptualizations of what counts as politics in the post-revolution city.}},
  author       = {{Salman, Lana}},
  issn         = {{0966-369X}},
  journal      = {{GENDER PLACE AND CULTURE}},
  keywords     = {{Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous),Cultural Studies,Demography,Gender Studies,Contestation,debt,popular neighbourhoods,post-revolution Tunisia,social reproduction,MICROFINANCE,POLITICS,GENDER}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{1--20}},
  title        = {{Revolutionary debtscapes : domestic territories of contestation in Tunisia}},
  url          = {{http://doi.org/10.1080/0966369x.2023.2280747}},
  year         = {{2024}},
}

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