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Associations of habitual sedentary time with executive functioning and short-term memory in 7th and 8th grade adolescents

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Abstract
BackgroundWhile there is increasing evidence for negative physical health consequences of high volumes of sedentary time and prolonged sedentary time in adolescents, the association with cognition is less clear. This study investigated the association of volumes of habitual sedentary time and prolonged sedentary time with executive functions and short-term memory in adolescents.MethodsThis study has a cross-sectional observational study design. Volumes of sedentary time and prolonged sedentary time (accumulated sedentary time spent in bouts of >= 30 min) were measured using the Axivity AX3 accelerometer. Six cognitive functions (spatial and verbal short-term memory; and working memory, visuospatial working memory, response inhibition and planning as executive functions) were measured using six validated cognitive assessments. Data were analysed using generalised linear models.ResultsData of 119 adolescents were analysed (49% boys, 13.4 +/- 0.6 year). No evidence for an association of volumes of sedentary time and prolonged sedentary time with spatial and verbal short-term memory, working memory, and visuospatial working memory was found. Volumes of sedentary time and prolonged sedentary time were significantly related to planning. One hour more sedentary time or prolonged sedentary time per day was associated with respectively on average 17.7% (95% C.I.: 3.5-29.7%) and 12.1% (95% C.I.: 3.9-19.6%) lower scores on the planning task.ConclusionsNo evidence was found for an association of volumes of habitual sedentary time and prolonged sedentary time with short-term memory and executive functions, except for planning. Furthermore, the context of sedentary activities could be an important confounder in the association of sedentary time and prolonged sedentary time with cognition among adolescents. Future research should therefore collect data on the context of sedentary activities.Trial registrationThis study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov in January 2020 (NCT04327414; released on March 11, 2020).
Keywords
Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health, Short-term memory, Executive function, Cognition, Sedentary behaviour, Adolescent

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MLA
Van Oeckel, Veerle, et al. “Associations of Habitual Sedentary Time with Executive Functioning and Short-Term Memory in 7th and 8th Grade Adolescents.” BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, vol. 24, no. 1, Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2024, doi:10.1186/s12889-024-18014-x.
APA
Van Oeckel, V., Poppe, L., Deforche, B., Brondeel, R., Miatton, M., & Verloigne, M. (2024). Associations of habitual sedentary time with executive functioning and short-term memory in 7th and 8th grade adolescents. BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, 24(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-024-18014-x
Chicago author-date
Van Oeckel, Veerle, Louise Poppe, Benedicte Deforche, Ruben Brondeel, Marijke Miatton, and Maïté Verloigne. 2024. “Associations of Habitual Sedentary Time with Executive Functioning and Short-Term Memory in 7th and 8th Grade Adolescents.” BMC PUBLIC HEALTH 24 (1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-024-18014-x.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Van Oeckel, Veerle, Louise Poppe, Benedicte Deforche, Ruben Brondeel, Marijke Miatton, and Maïté Verloigne. 2024. “Associations of Habitual Sedentary Time with Executive Functioning and Short-Term Memory in 7th and 8th Grade Adolescents.” BMC PUBLIC HEALTH 24 (1). doi:10.1186/s12889-024-18014-x.
Vancouver
1.
Van Oeckel V, Poppe L, Deforche B, Brondeel R, Miatton M, Verloigne M. Associations of habitual sedentary time with executive functioning and short-term memory in 7th and 8th grade adolescents. BMC PUBLIC HEALTH. 2024;24(1).
IEEE
[1]
V. Van Oeckel, L. Poppe, B. Deforche, R. Brondeel, M. Miatton, and M. Verloigne, “Associations of habitual sedentary time with executive functioning and short-term memory in 7th and 8th grade adolescents,” BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, vol. 24, no. 1, 2024.
@article{01HR4HRZGVV20NPZKESXC0AR4P,
  abstract     = {{
BackgroundWhile there is increasing evidence for negative physical health consequences of high volumes of sedentary time and prolonged sedentary time in adolescents, the association with cognition is less clear. This study investigated the association of volumes of habitual sedentary time and prolonged sedentary time with executive functions and short-term memory in adolescents.MethodsThis study has a cross-sectional observational study design. Volumes of sedentary time and prolonged sedentary time (accumulated sedentary time spent in bouts of >= 30 min) were measured using the Axivity AX3 accelerometer. Six cognitive functions (spatial and verbal short-term memory; and working memory, visuospatial working memory, response inhibition and planning as executive functions) were measured using six validated cognitive assessments. Data were analysed using generalised linear models.ResultsData of 119 adolescents were analysed (49% boys, 13.4 +/- 0.6 year). No evidence for an association of volumes of sedentary time and prolonged sedentary time with spatial and verbal short-term memory, working memory, and visuospatial working memory was found. Volumes of sedentary time and prolonged sedentary time were significantly related to planning. One hour more sedentary time or prolonged sedentary time per day was associated with respectively on average 17.7% (95% C.I.: 3.5-29.7%) and 12.1% (95% C.I.: 3.9-19.6%) lower scores on the planning task.ConclusionsNo evidence was found for an association of volumes of habitual sedentary time and prolonged sedentary time with short-term memory and executive functions, except for planning. Furthermore, the context of sedentary activities could be an important confounder in the association of sedentary time and prolonged sedentary time with cognition among adolescents. Future research should therefore collect data on the context of sedentary activities.Trial registrationThis study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov in January 2020 (NCT04327414; released on March 11, 2020).}},
  articleno    = {{495}},
  author       = {{Van Oeckel, Veerle and Poppe, Louise and Deforche, Benedicte and Brondeel, Ruben and Miatton, Marijke and Verloigne, Maïté}},
  issn         = {{1471-2458}},
  journal      = {{BMC PUBLIC HEALTH}},
  keywords     = {{Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health,Short-term memory,Executive function,Cognition,Sedentary behaviour,Adolescent}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{1}},
  pages        = {{15}},
  publisher    = {{Springer Science and Business Media LLC}},
  title        = {{Associations of habitual sedentary time with executive functioning and short-term memory in 7th and 8th grade adolescents}},
  url          = {{http://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-024-18014-x}},
  volume       = {{24}},
  year         = {{2024}},
}

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