Advanced search
1 file | 14.36 KB Add to list

Scrolling through parenthood: a bibliometric analysis, literature review and future research agenda

Guoquan Ye, Ellen Mertens (UGent) , Liselot Hudders (UGent) and Emma Beuckels (UGent)
(2024)
Author
Organization
Abstract
Becoming a parent often elicits an overwhelming feeling and many insecurities (e.g. Nyström & Öhrling, 2004), whereby parents encounter an intricate transformation of their identity (Laney et al., 2015). In today’s digital era, social media play an important role in how parents manage the everyday issues they encounter and the decisions they need to make (Jang et al., 2015; Moon et al., 2019). This comes as no surprise, as the popularity of social media is massive with a total of 4.26 billion users worldwide in 2021 (Statista, 2023b). The largest group of social media users are people between 25 and 34 years old (Statista, 2023a), which corresponds to the age group of many young parents (Egmose et al., 2022). Research shows that parents actively search for social support and parenting information online (Dworkin et al., 2013; Frey et al., 2022; Moon et al., 2019). Whereas previous generations often relied on their family and close friends when looking for parenting information, today’s parents heavily depend on social media as their primary source of parenting information where they tend to share information and experiences with like-minded others (Frey et al., 2022). Although the impact of social media on parents has already been studied in multiple scientific fields and specific subdomains such as health sciences, communication, or pedagogic research (Aldekhyyel et al., 2022; Beuckels & De Jans, 2022), papers consolidating these multidisciplinary findings are scarce. Only six review papers relating to parenthood and social media could be identified covering (some of) the topics of this study. Therefore, this study broadens the scope of the existing reviews by transcending narrow academic subdomains and including all relevant research insights related to parents' information seeking on social media and its consequent effects through a bibliometric literature review of 338 studies. The aim of this study is to (1) identify influential journals and scholars in the field, (2) examine the thematic evolution of research on parenting and social media, and (3) pinpoint research gaps, providing recommendations for future exploration. The analysis reveals a significant increase in research on parenting and social media since 2015, especially in the medical domain. Research on parenting information was conducted in 232 journals, which indicates the broad attention to the topic in various domains. The journal ‘pediatrics and parenting’ was the most prolific journal and the results reveal that there is no dominant author in the domain of parenting and social media. Furthermore, the thematic analysis identified four emerging research themes in the studies: parenting motivations to seek information, nature of parenting content on social media, impact of parenting content, and interventions for parents on social media. Most of the studies (n = 174) focused on the type of parenting content that is available on social media, predominantly in the medical field. Insights from the thematic content analysis of these themes helped us to address the last research objective: discovering the research gaps and provide recommendations for future research. Accordingly, a future research agenda based on the research gaps in terms of methodologies, communicator, message, medium, audience and effects was proposed to guide future research in the emerging area of parenting and social media. This study provides critical insights into the current research landscape and underscores the necessity for further investigations in the domain of parenting and social media.
Keywords
Systematic Literature Review, Bibliometric Literature Review, Thematic Analysis, Parenting, social media, parenting information

Downloads

  • (...).docx
    • colophon/title page
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • Word
    • |
    • 14.36 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Ye, Guoquan, et al. Scrolling through Parenthood: A Bibliometric Analysis, Literature Review and Future Research Agenda. 2024.
APA
Ye, G., Mertens, E., Hudders, L., & Beuckels, E. (2024). Scrolling through parenthood: a bibliometric analysis, literature review and future research agenda. Presented at the Etmaal van de Communicatiewetenschap, Rotterdam.
Chicago author-date
Ye, Guoquan, Ellen Mertens, Liselot Hudders, and Emma Beuckels. 2024. “Scrolling through Parenthood: A Bibliometric Analysis, Literature Review and Future Research Agenda.” In .
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Ye, Guoquan, Ellen Mertens, Liselot Hudders, and Emma Beuckels. 2024. “Scrolling through Parenthood: A Bibliometric Analysis, Literature Review and Future Research Agenda.” In .
Vancouver
1.
Ye G, Mertens E, Hudders L, Beuckels E. Scrolling through parenthood: a bibliometric analysis, literature review and future research agenda. In 2024.
IEEE
[1]
G. Ye, E. Mertens, L. Hudders, and E. Beuckels, “Scrolling through parenthood: a bibliometric analysis, literature review and future research agenda,” presented at the Etmaal van de Communicatiewetenschap, Rotterdam, 2024.
@inproceedings{01HQQCX8HJNP9N459DGSMKWRDV,
  abstract     = {{Becoming a parent often elicits an overwhelming feeling and many insecurities (e.g. Nyström & Öhrling, 2004), whereby parents encounter an intricate transformation of their identity (Laney et al., 2015). In today’s digital era, social media play an important role in how parents manage the everyday issues they encounter and the decisions they need to make (Jang et al., 2015; Moon et al., 2019). This comes as no surprise, as the popularity of social media is massive with a total of  4.26 billion users worldwide in 2021 (Statista, 2023b). The largest group of social media users are people between 25 and 34 years old (Statista, 2023a), which corresponds to the age group of many young parents (Egmose et al., 2022). Research shows that parents actively search for social support and parenting information online (Dworkin et al., 2013; Frey et al., 2022; Moon et al., 2019). Whereas previous generations often relied on their family and close friends when looking for parenting information, today’s parents heavily depend on social media as their primary source of parenting information where they tend to share information and experiences with like-minded others (Frey et al., 2022). 
Although the impact of social media on parents has already been studied in multiple scientific fields and specific subdomains such as health sciences, communication, or pedagogic research (Aldekhyyel et al., 2022; Beuckels & De Jans, 2022), papers consolidating these multidisciplinary findings are scarce. Only six review papers relating to parenthood and social media could be identified covering (some of) the topics of this study. Therefore, this study broadens the scope of the existing reviews by transcending narrow academic subdomains and including all relevant research insights related to parents' information seeking on social media and its consequent effects through a bibliometric literature review of 338 studies. The aim of this study is to (1) identify influential journals and scholars in the field, (2) examine the thematic evolution of research on parenting and social media, and (3) pinpoint research gaps, providing recommendations for future exploration. 
The analysis reveals a significant increase in research on parenting and social media since 2015, especially in the medical domain. Research on parenting information was conducted in 232 journals, which indicates the broad attention to the topic in various domains. The journal ‘pediatrics and parenting’ was the most prolific journal and the results reveal that there is no dominant author in the domain of parenting and social media. Furthermore, the thematic analysis identified four emerging research themes in the studies: parenting motivations to seek information, nature of parenting content on social media, impact of parenting content, and interventions for parents on social media. Most of the studies (n = 174) focused on the type of parenting content that is available on social media, predominantly in the medical field. Insights from the thematic content analysis of these themes helped us to address the last research objective: discovering the research gaps and provide recommendations for future research. Accordingly, a future research agenda based on the research gaps in terms of methodologies, communicator, message, medium, audience and effects was proposed to guide future research in the emerging area of parenting and social media. This study provides critical insights into the current research landscape and underscores the necessity for further investigations in the domain of parenting and social media.}},
  author       = {{Ye, Guoquan and Mertens, Ellen and Hudders, Liselot and Beuckels, Emma}},
  keywords     = {{Systematic Literature Review,Bibliometric Literature Review,Thematic Analysis,Parenting,social media,parenting information}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  location     = {{Rotterdam}},
  title        = {{Scrolling through parenthood: a bibliometric analysis, literature review and future research agenda}},
  year         = {{2024}},
}