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'Small towns' dell'Italia romana : da una prospettiva diacronica a una regionale

Frank Vermeulen (UGent)
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Abstract
A substantial majority of cities in Roman Italy can be considered as small towns. All of these circa 270 high order settlements measured less than 20 hectares and most of them can hardly be seen as dense urban population centres. Some were developed and planned during the Republic as smaller Roman colonies, reflecting the larger high status colonial centres that impacted greatly on the newly conquered Italian territories. Others were transformations of indigenous centres which gradually took the appearance of their Roman role models. Particularly in the latest phases of the Republic and during the early Imperial period, however, widespread processes of urbanization and municipalisation created a category of cities that were both smaller, and less consistently planned. Many developed along the road system and were clustered around an Augustan era forum in the centre of an agriculturally rich river basin or settlement chamber. The regional economy, elite competition and the needs for administrative organization were some of the main driving forces for their gradual development. This paper discusses some of the characteristics of this particular urban landscape in Italy, which shows many parallels with provincial contexts in West and East. To demonstrate the importance of regionalism, there is a focus on the recently investigated network of small towns in central Adriatic Italy, where urbanism studies and landscape archaeology approaches allow now a more holistic discussion of this phenomenon. Looking at archaeological evidence from multiple small urban sites, away from the traditionally studied centres in Latium and Campania, such as Ostia and Pompeii, allows a deeper understanding of the remarkable diversity of Roman cityscapes.
Keywords
Urbanism, Archaeology, Antiquity, Regionalism, Diachronic

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MLA
Vermeulen, Frank. “‘Small Towns’ Dell’Italia Romana : Da Una Prospettiva Diacronica a Una Regionale.” Small Towns : Una Realidad Urbana En La Hispania Romana, edited by Pedro Mateos et al., vol. 10, Instituto de Arqueología de Mérida, 2022, pp. 29–41.
APA
Vermeulen, F. (2022). “Small towns” dell’Italia romana : da una prospettiva diacronica a una regionale. In P. Mateos, M. Olcina, A. Pizzo, & T. G. Schattner (Eds.), Small towns : una realidad urbana en la Hispania romana (Vol. 10, pp. 29–41). Mérida: Instituto de Arqueología de Mérida.
Chicago author-date
Vermeulen, Frank. 2022. “‘Small Towns’ Dell’Italia Romana : Da Una Prospettiva Diacronica a Una Regionale.” In Small Towns : Una Realidad Urbana En La Hispania Romana, edited by Pedro Mateos, Manuel Olcina, Antonio Pizzo, and Thomas G. Schattner, 10:29–41. Mérida: Instituto de Arqueología de Mérida.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Vermeulen, Frank. 2022. “‘Small Towns’ Dell’Italia Romana : Da Una Prospettiva Diacronica a Una Regionale.” In Small Towns : Una Realidad Urbana En La Hispania Romana, ed by. Pedro Mateos, Manuel Olcina, Antonio Pizzo, and Thomas G. Schattner, 10:29–41. Mérida: Instituto de Arqueología de Mérida.
Vancouver
1.
Vermeulen F. “Small towns” dell’Italia romana : da una prospettiva diacronica a una regionale. In: Mateos P, Olcina M, Pizzo A, Schattner TG, editors. Small towns : una realidad urbana en la Hispania romana. Mérida: Instituto de Arqueología de Mérida; 2022. p. 29–41.
IEEE
[1]
F. Vermeulen, “‘Small towns’ dell’Italia romana : da una prospettiva diacronica a una regionale,” in Small towns : una realidad urbana en la Hispania romana, MARQ Museo Arqueológico de Alicante, 2022, vol. 10, pp. 29–41.
@inproceedings{01HQ803YNVR1ZDXYYTSP6WMK0K,
  abstract     = {{A substantial majority of cities in Roman Italy can be considered as small towns. All of these circa 270 high order settlements measured less than 20 hectares and most of them can hardly be seen as dense urban population centres. Some were developed and planned during the Republic as smaller Roman colonies, reflecting the larger high status colonial centres that impacted greatly on the newly conquered Italian territories. Others were transformations of indigenous centres which gradually took the appearance of their Roman role models. Particularly in the latest phases of the Republic and during the early Imperial period, however, widespread processes of urbanization and municipalisation created a category of cities that were both smaller, and less consistently planned. Many developed along the road system and were clustered around an Augustan era forum in the centre of an agriculturally rich river basin or settlement chamber. The regional economy, elite competition and the needs for administrative organization were some of the main driving forces for their gradual development. This paper discusses some of the characteristics of this particular urban landscape in Italy, which shows many parallels with provincial contexts in West and East. To demonstrate the importance of regionalism, there is a focus on the recently investigated network of small towns in central Adriatic Italy, where urbanism studies and landscape archaeology approaches allow now a more holistic discussion of this phenomenon. Looking at archaeological evidence from multiple small urban sites, away from the traditionally studied centres in Latium and Campania, such as Ostia and Pompeii, allows a deeper understanding of the remarkable diversity of Roman cityscapes.}},
  author       = {{Vermeulen, Frank}},
  booktitle    = {{Small towns : una realidad urbana en la Hispania romana}},
  editor       = {{Mateos, Pedro and Olcina, Manuel and Pizzo, Antonio and Schattner, Thomas G.}},
  isbn         = {{9788409458080}},
  keywords     = {{Urbanism,Archaeology,Antiquity,Regionalism,Diachronic}},
  language     = {{ita}},
  location     = {{MARQ Museo Arqueológico de Alicante}},
  pages        = {{29--41}},
  publisher    = {{Instituto de Arqueología de Mérida}},
  title        = {{'Small towns' dell'Italia romana : da una prospettiva diacronica a una regionale}},
  volume       = {{10}},
  year         = {{2022}},
}