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Timber-framing in Late Medieval Flemish cities : an archaeological and building historical approach to urban housing

Lennert Lapeere (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
The late medieval Flemish cities were amongst the most populated in western Europe and had a dense urban fabric. Iconographic sources, such as the cityscapes on the Ghent Altarpiece (finished in 1432), show that a substantial part of the townhouses was built using timber-framing techniques. Unlike these iconographic sources, building historical and archaeological data were initially scarce and difficult to interpret. New archaeological research of the last decades combined with building historical analysis made it possible to present a first overview of timber-framed townhouses between ca. 1200 and 1500 in the study area, including present-day French Flanders (Northern France), the provinces of West and East Flanders (Belgium) and Zeeland (Netherlands). An overview of all used foundation techniques shows a clear shift from earthfast post construction to stone building and timber-framed structures on sill walls or padstones. Building historical analysis of the interior wooden structure of preserved stone townhouses of Bruges and Ghent proves the importance of wood in late medieval structures. The existing wooden house fronts are carefully made and were no cheap alternative of complete stone houses but status symbols on their own. The analysis of all excavated medieval houses of the medium-sized city of Aalst shows the use of different materials and building techniques in between urban quarters and its evolution through time. These data compared with other excavated sites in Ninove, Ronse, Sluis, Ypres, and Douai gives an evolution of the appearance, building materials, and layout of urban housing but also about plot layout and orientation to the existing urban infrastructure. Some regional differences became apparent in the use of materials and construction techniques.

Citation

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MLA
Lapeere, Lennert. “Timber-Framing in Late Medieval Flemish Cities : An Archaeological and Building Historical Approach to Urban Housing.” 29th EAA Annual Meeting (Belfast, 2023) : Abstract Book, European Association of Archaeologists, 2023, pp. 646–47.
APA
Lapeere, L. (2023). Timber-framing in Late Medieval Flemish cities : an archaeological and building historical approach to urban housing. 29th EAA Annual Meeting (Belfast, 2023) : Abstract Book, 646–647. European Association of Archaeologists.
Chicago author-date
Lapeere, Lennert. 2023. “Timber-Framing in Late Medieval Flemish Cities : An Archaeological and Building Historical Approach to Urban Housing.” In 29th EAA Annual Meeting (Belfast, 2023) : Abstract Book, 646–47. European Association of Archaeologists.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Lapeere, Lennert. 2023. “Timber-Framing in Late Medieval Flemish Cities : An Archaeological and Building Historical Approach to Urban Housing.” In 29th EAA Annual Meeting (Belfast, 2023) : Abstract Book, 646–647. European Association of Archaeologists.
Vancouver
1.
Lapeere L. Timber-framing in Late Medieval Flemish cities : an archaeological and building historical approach to urban housing. In: 29th EAA Annual Meeting (Belfast, 2023) : Abstract book. European Association of Archaeologists; 2023. p. 646–7.
IEEE
[1]
L. Lapeere, “Timber-framing in Late Medieval Flemish cities : an archaeological and building historical approach to urban housing,” in 29th EAA Annual Meeting (Belfast, 2023) : Abstract book, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 2023, pp. 646–647.
@inproceedings{01HMCD5X48XFGCJRD89E5XESME,
  abstract     = {{The late medieval Flemish cities were amongst the most populated in western Europe and had a dense urban fabric. Iconographic sources, such as the cityscapes on the Ghent Altarpiece (finished in 1432), show that a substantial part of the townhouses was built using timber-framing techniques. Unlike these iconographic sources, building historical and archaeological data were initially scarce and difficult to interpret. New archaeological research of the last decades combined with building historical analysis made it possible to present a first overview of timber-framed townhouses between ca. 1200 and 1500 in the study area, including present-day French Flanders (Northern France), the provinces of West and East Flanders (Belgium) and Zeeland (Netherlands).
An overview of all used foundation techniques shows a clear shift from earthfast post construction to stone building and timber-framed structures on sill walls or padstones. Building historical analysis of the interior wooden structure of preserved stone townhouses of Bruges and Ghent proves the importance of wood in late medieval structures. The existing wooden house fronts are carefully made and were no cheap alternative of complete stone houses but status symbols on their own.
The analysis of all excavated medieval houses of the medium-sized city of Aalst shows the use of different materials and building techniques in between urban quarters and its evolution through time. These data compared with other excavated sites in Ninove, Ronse, Sluis, Ypres, and Douai gives an evolution of the appearance, building materials, and layout of urban housing but also about plot layout and orientation to the existing urban infrastructure. Some regional differences became apparent in the use of materials and construction techniques.}},
  author       = {{Lapeere, Lennert}},
  booktitle    = {{29th EAA Annual Meeting (Belfast, 2023) : Abstract book}},
  isbn         = {{9788088441052}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  location     = {{Belfast, Northern Ireland}},
  pages        = {{646--647}},
  publisher    = {{European Association of Archaeologists}},
  title        = {{Timber-framing in Late Medieval Flemish cities : an archaeological and building historical approach to urban housing}},
  url          = {{https://www.e-a-a.org/EAA2023}},
  year         = {{2023}},
}