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Protecting public health and the environment : towards a general ban on cellulose acetate cigarette filters in the European Union

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Abstract
After the establishment of a causal relationship between tobacco use and cancer in the 1950s, cellulose acetate filters were introduced with the claim to reduce the adverse health impact of unfiltered cigarettes. Often perceived to be more pleasant and healthy, filters encouraged smoking. However, filtered cigarettes are more deeply inhaled to obtain the same nicotine demand while altered combustion releases more tobacco-specific nitrosamines. The increasing use of cigarette filter ventilation is associated with a sharp rise in lung adenocarcinomas in recent decades. While not preventing adverse health effects, a global environmental problem has been created due to the non-biodegradable filter litter, causing ecotoxicological effects and the spread of microplastics. Recently, the Belgian Superior Health Council advised policymakers to ban cigarette filters as single-use plastics at both national and European levels. This article outlines the arguments used to justify this plea (human health and environment), the expected effects of a filter ban, as well as the public reception and reactions of the tobacco industry. The specific context of the European Union is discussed including the revision of the Single-Use Plastics Directive, affording a new opportunity to ban plastic filters. This perspective article aims to fuel the momentum and cooperation among member states for this purpose.
Keywords
smoking prevention, tobacco, cigarette filter, adenocarcinoma, ecotoxicology, LUNG-CANCER, TOBACCO-SMOKE, RISK, ADENOCARCINOMA, TOXICITY, BUTTS, CARBOXYHEMOGLOBIN, EPIDEMIOLOGY, VENTILATION, MORTALITY

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MLA
Everaert, Stijn, et al. “Protecting Public Health and the Environment : Towards a General Ban on Cellulose Acetate Cigarette Filters in the European Union.” FRONTIERS IN PUBLIC HEALTH, vol. 11, 2023, doi:10.3389/fpubh.2023.1282655.
APA
Everaert, S., Schoeters, G., Lardon, F., Janssens, A., Van Larebeke, N., Raquez, J.-M., … Spanoghe, P. (2023). Protecting public health and the environment : towards a general ban on cellulose acetate cigarette filters in the European Union. FRONTIERS IN PUBLIC HEALTH, 11. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2023.1282655
Chicago author-date
Everaert, Stijn, Greet Schoeters, Filip Lardon, Annelies Janssens, Nicolas Van Larebeke, Jean-Marie Raquez, Lieven Bervoets, and Pieter Spanoghe. 2023. “Protecting Public Health and the Environment : Towards a General Ban on Cellulose Acetate Cigarette Filters in the European Union.” FRONTIERS IN PUBLIC HEALTH 11. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2023.1282655.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Everaert, Stijn, Greet Schoeters, Filip Lardon, Annelies Janssens, Nicolas Van Larebeke, Jean-Marie Raquez, Lieven Bervoets, and Pieter Spanoghe. 2023. “Protecting Public Health and the Environment : Towards a General Ban on Cellulose Acetate Cigarette Filters in the European Union.” FRONTIERS IN PUBLIC HEALTH 11. doi:10.3389/fpubh.2023.1282655.
Vancouver
1.
Everaert S, Schoeters G, Lardon F, Janssens A, Van Larebeke N, Raquez J-M, et al. Protecting public health and the environment : towards a general ban on cellulose acetate cigarette filters in the European Union. FRONTIERS IN PUBLIC HEALTH. 2023;11.
IEEE
[1]
S. Everaert et al., “Protecting public health and the environment : towards a general ban on cellulose acetate cigarette filters in the European Union,” FRONTIERS IN PUBLIC HEALTH, vol. 11, 2023.
@article{01HEPY7G05WXBBE8R7VSCFMHGT,
  abstract     = {{After the establishment of a causal relationship between tobacco use and cancer in the 1950s, cellulose acetate filters were introduced with the claim to reduce the adverse health impact of unfiltered cigarettes. Often perceived to be more pleasant and healthy, filters encouraged smoking. However, filtered cigarettes are more deeply inhaled to obtain the same nicotine demand while altered combustion releases more tobacco-specific nitrosamines. The increasing use of cigarette filter ventilation is associated with a sharp rise in lung adenocarcinomas in recent decades. While not preventing adverse health effects, a global environmental problem has been created due to the non-biodegradable filter litter, causing ecotoxicological effects and the spread of microplastics. Recently, the Belgian Superior Health Council advised policymakers to ban cigarette filters as single-use plastics at both national and European levels. This article outlines the arguments used to justify this plea (human health and environment), the expected effects of a filter ban, as well as the public reception and reactions of the tobacco industry. The specific context of the European Union is discussed including the revision of the Single-Use Plastics Directive, affording a new opportunity to ban plastic filters. This perspective article aims to fuel the momentum and cooperation among member states for this purpose.
}},
  articleno    = {{1282655}},
  author       = {{Everaert, Stijn and Schoeters, Greet and Lardon, Filip and Janssens, Annelies and Van Larebeke, Nicolas and Raquez, Jean-Marie and Bervoets, Lieven and Spanoghe, Pieter}},
  issn         = {{2296-2565}},
  journal      = {{FRONTIERS IN PUBLIC HEALTH}},
  keywords     = {{smoking prevention,tobacco,cigarette filter,adenocarcinoma,ecotoxicology,LUNG-CANCER,TOBACCO-SMOKE,RISK,ADENOCARCINOMA,TOXICITY,BUTTS,CARBOXYHEMOGLOBIN,EPIDEMIOLOGY,VENTILATION,MORTALITY}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{7}},
  title        = {{Protecting public health and the environment : towards a general ban on cellulose acetate cigarette filters in the European Union}},
  url          = {{http://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2023.1282655}},
  volume       = {{11}},
  year         = {{2023}},
}

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