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Cathodoluminescence microscopy for detailed phosphor evaluation

Lisa Martin (UGent)
(2023)
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(UGent) and (UGent)
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Abstract
An electron microscope is the perfect tool to study inorganic luminescent materials, also known as phosphors. When the electron beam scans the surface of these materials, often powders, a large number of signals are generated that offer information about the morphology and elemental composition of the studied specimen. Under the influence of electron excitation, phosphors will also emit cathodoluminescence. By directing this light to a spectrometer, both optical and structural information can be extracted from a region of about 1 μm³. This PhD research focuses primarily on an efficient, semi-automated correlation of the data streams coming from different, non-communicating detectors. In addition, temperature- and time-dependent measurements are implemented such that a complete optical characterisation can take place within the electron microscope. The unique combination of emission spectrum and microscopic-scale chemical analysis allows rapid evaluation of the quality of material syntheses, both in terms of the possible presence of impurity phases as well as the distribution of luminescent centers. More in-depth studies on specific behaviour, such as thermal quenching, preferential outcoupling behavior or persistent luminescence are also among the possibilities. Using several case studies, the power of this technique is highlighted. Scanning electron microscopy with combined cathodoluminescence and energydispersive X-ray spectroscopy has contributed to numerous projects and opens the door to more efficient phosphor development and a deeper understanding of the complex interplay of structure, composition and light emission.

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Martin, Lisa. Cathodoluminescence Microscopy for Detailed Phosphor Evaluation. Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences, 2023.
APA
Martin, L. (2023). Cathodoluminescence microscopy for detailed phosphor evaluation. Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences, Ghent, Belgium.
Chicago author-date
Martin, Lisa. 2023. “Cathodoluminescence Microscopy for Detailed Phosphor Evaluation.” Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Martin, Lisa. 2023. “Cathodoluminescence Microscopy for Detailed Phosphor Evaluation.” Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences.
Vancouver
1.
Martin L. Cathodoluminescence microscopy for detailed phosphor evaluation. [Ghent, Belgium]: Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences; 2023.
IEEE
[1]
L. Martin, “Cathodoluminescence microscopy for detailed phosphor evaluation,” Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences, Ghent, Belgium, 2023.
@phdthesis{01H4DYBEPHD0TY0GTRQ5WPZC3T,
  abstract     = {{An electron microscope is the perfect tool to study inorganic luminescent materials,
also known as phosphors. When the electron beam scans the surface of these
materials, often powders, a large number of signals are generated that offer
information about the morphology and elemental composition of the studied
specimen. Under the influence of electron excitation, phosphors will also emit
cathodoluminescence. By directing this light to a spectrometer, both optical and
structural information can be extracted from a region of about 1 μm³.
This PhD research focuses primarily on an efficient, semi-automated correlation of
the data streams coming from different, non-communicating detectors. In addition,
temperature- and time-dependent measurements are implemented such that a
complete optical characterisation can take place within the electron microscope. The
unique combination of emission spectrum and microscopic-scale chemical analysis
allows rapid evaluation of the quality of material syntheses, both in terms of the
possible presence of impurity phases as well as the distribution of luminescent
centers. More in-depth studies on specific behaviour, such as thermal quenching,
preferential outcoupling behavior or persistent luminescence are also among the
possibilities. Using several case studies, the power of this technique is highlighted.

Scanning electron microscopy with combined cathodoluminescence and energydispersive
X-ray spectroscopy has contributed to numerous projects and opens the
door to more efficient phosphor development and a deeper understanding of the
complex interplay of structure, composition and light emission.}},
  author       = {{Martin, Lisa}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{XXII, 248}},
  publisher    = {{Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences}},
  school       = {{Ghent University}},
  title        = {{Cathodoluminescence microscopy for detailed phosphor evaluation}},
  year         = {{2023}},
}