Advanced search
1 file | 6.41 MB Add to list

Picart, Bernard, and the economization of spiritual life in the early eighteenth century

Steff Nellis (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
In The Spirit of French Capitalism (2021), Charly Coleman provides a telling addition to Max Weber’s thesis in The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (1905) by framing a particular chronotope in the emergence of Capitalism: the ‘economization of spiritual life’ at the dawn of the French Enlightenment. By means of the concept of ‘economic theology’ Coleman denotes the economic dimensions of theology, thereby hinting at the existence of a vast spiritual economy: the convergence of spiritual and material wealth in early modern French Catholicism. To formulate his argument, Coleman provides his readers with an illustrative case study: the Cérémonies et coutumes religieuses de tous les peuples du monde (1723–1737). Published in Amsterdam by the exiled Huguenot Jean Frederic Bernard and lavishly illustrated by one of the most famous engravers of that time, Bernard Picart, this book series provided a revolutionary insight into all the world’s religions by comparing ceremonies, customs, and rituals on an equal footing. On the one hand, it did provide its readers with a general critique of ceremonial splendor, especially within the Catholic Church. On the other hand, however, the books also illustrate the other side of the ‘economization of spiritual life’: an increasing focus of the Dutch free publishing market on producing marketized knowledge. While religion might have turned into commodities because of the fetishist reliance on devotional practices and items, throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries knowledge turned into a fetish of economic interest too. Hence, the Dutch knowledge society provides a scholarly example of an affective economy in which the Cérémonies provide insights into both Coleman’s Catholic spiritual economy as well as Weber’s Protestant political economy.
Keywords
Picart, Bernard, Economic theology, religious ceremonies

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • table of contents
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 6.41 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Nellis, Steff. “Picart, Bernard, and the Economization of Spiritual Life in the Early Eighteenth Century.” 12th Annual RefoRC Conference on Early Modern Christianity, Abstracts, 2023.
APA
Nellis, S. (2023). Picart, Bernard, and the economization of spiritual life in the early eighteenth century. 12th Annual RefoRC Conference on Early Modern Christianity, Abstracts. Presented at the 12th Annual RefoRC Conference on Early Modern Christianity, Leuven, Belgium.
Chicago author-date
Nellis, Steff. 2023. “Picart, Bernard, and the Economization of Spiritual Life in the Early Eighteenth Century.” In 12th Annual RefoRC Conference on Early Modern Christianity, Abstracts.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Nellis, Steff. 2023. “Picart, Bernard, and the Economization of Spiritual Life in the Early Eighteenth Century.” In 12th Annual RefoRC Conference on Early Modern Christianity, Abstracts.
Vancouver
1.
Nellis S. Picart, Bernard, and the economization of spiritual life in the early eighteenth century. In: 12th Annual RefoRC Conference on Early Modern Christianity, Abstracts. 2023.
IEEE
[1]
S. Nellis, “Picart, Bernard, and the economization of spiritual life in the early eighteenth century,” in 12th Annual RefoRC Conference on Early Modern Christianity, Abstracts, Leuven, Belgium, 2023.
@inproceedings{01H0HX6C3KFXRBYG08HZ5XGE1B,
  abstract     = {{In The Spirit of French Capitalism (2021),
Charly Coleman provides a telling
addition to Max Weber’s thesis in
The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit
of Capitalism (1905) by framing a
particular chronotope in the emergence
of Capitalism: the ‘economization
of spiritual life’ at the dawn of the
French Enlightenment. By means of
the concept of ‘economic theology’
Coleman denotes the economic
dimensions of theology, thereby hinting
at the existence of a vast spiritual
economy: the convergence of spiritual
and material wealth in early modern
French Catholicism. To formulate
his argument, Coleman provides his
readers with an illustrative case study:
the Cérémonies et coutumes religieuses
de tous les peuples du monde (1723–1737).
Published in Amsterdam by the exiled
Huguenot Jean Frederic Bernard and
lavishly illustrated by one of the most
famous engravers of that time, Bernard
Picart, this book series provided a
revolutionary insight into all the world’s
religions by comparing ceremonies,
customs, and rituals on an equal
footing. On the one hand, it did provide
its readers with a general critique of
ceremonial splendor, especially within
the Catholic Church. On the other
hand, however, the books also illustrate
the other side of the ‘economization
of spiritual life’: an increasing focus
of the Dutch free publishing market
on producing marketized knowledge.
While religion might have turned into
commodities because of the fetishist
reliance on devotional practices and
items, throughout the seventeenth
and eighteenth centuries knowledge
turned into a fetish of economic interest
too. Hence, the Dutch knowledge
society provides a scholarly example
of an affective economy in which
the Cérémonies provide insights into
both Coleman’s Catholic spiritual
economy as well as Weber’s Protestant
political economy.}},
  author       = {{Nellis, Steff}},
  booktitle    = {{12th Annual RefoRC Conference on Early Modern Christianity, Abstracts}},
  keywords     = {{Picart,Bernard,Economic theology,religious ceremonies}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  location     = {{Leuven, Belgium}},
  title        = {{Picart, Bernard, and the economization of spiritual life in the early eighteenth century}},
  url          = {{https://reforc.com/reforc-conferences/}},
  year         = {{2023}},
}