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What do families talk about? Reciprocal influence towards pro-environmental behaviours and concern in the household

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Abstract
It is considered that the effort to reduce the anthropogenic impact should be not solely an individual effort but requires collective action, including efforts within the household dialogue. Evidence reveals that individual efficacy to adopt pro-environmental behaviours depends strongly on the household dynamics to achieve the expected goal. On top of it, collective action is important to achieve difficult goals (such as conservation behaviours). Additionally, household members (parents and children) strongly influence the behaviours of each other (e.g., reversed socialization). Therefore, the household dynamics can have an impact on the adoption of pro-environmental behaviours. As such, this study focuses on understanding which factors stimulate the communication at the household level, among parents and children, about climate change. Via an online survey, 714 Belgian parents (of children between 8-18 years old) selfreported on the frequency of the communication about environmental protection and risks within their household (including various topics, depth of conversation, valence, among other components of the communication), their acceptance of reversed socialization (childrens’ influence on parents), and personal factors (e.g., coping mechanisms towards climate change, pro-environmental behaviours). The results reveal that the communication about the environment within the household was moderately frequent (M = 3.06, SD = 0.76). After performing an exploratory factor analysis (PCA), four different topics of communication were identified; sustainable household practices (M = 3.65, SD = 0.86) and parental instructing towards sustainable behavior (M = 3.31, SD = 0.90) were the most frequent followed by schoolrelated (M = 2.98, SD = 0.94) and outer influence topics (M = 2.75, SD = 0.87). A step-wise regression revealed that the overall communication frequency in the household was associated with acceptance of reversed socialization along with children frequently initiating the communication. Moreover, step-wise regressions for each topic were performed to understand more in depth the predictors associated respectively. Conversations related to sustainable household practices were associated with positive communication, and positive parental reaction (i.e. when the kids show environmental concern); while parental instructing was associated with parent’s perceptions to be able to include the children in the conversation. Both topics were also associated with higher reported pro-environmental behaviours of the parent, the parents being the conversation initiator; yet, the communication frequency decreased when meaning-making was the parent’s dominant coping mechanism (i.e., dealing with their concerns related to sustainability with positive feelings such as hope and trust on the competence of others to solve the problem). Furthermore, household communication related to sustainability was more frequently related to school, when environmental concern displayed from the school was higher, and when parents reported to apply a problem-solving coping mechanism . The outer influence communication was particularly associated with higher moral obligation of the parents to conduct sustainable behavior. Finally, for the late two topics, common predictors were the acceptance of reversed socialization and higher frequency of the child initiating the conversation. The study brings to light the impact of parents’ acceptance of reversed socialization and their environmental coping mechanisms to stimulate communication about environmental protection and risks.

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MLA
Vazquez Casaubon, Estefanya Charlotte, et al. “What Do Families Talk about? Reciprocal Influence towards pro-Environmental Behaviours and Concern in the Household.” ECREA 2022, Electronic Book of Abstracts, CZECH-IN, 2022, pp. 400–400.
APA
Vazquez Casaubon, E. C., Cauberghe, V., & Van de Sompel, D. (2022). What do families talk about? Reciprocal influence towards pro-environmental behaviours and concern in the household. ECREA 2022, Electronic Book of Abstracts, 400–400. Prague: CZECH-IN.
Chicago author-date
Vazquez Casaubon, Estefanya Charlotte, Veroline Cauberghe, and Dieneke Van de Sompel. 2022. “What Do Families Talk about? Reciprocal Influence towards pro-Environmental Behaviours and Concern in the Household.” In ECREA 2022, Electronic Book of Abstracts, 400–400. Prague: CZECH-IN.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Vazquez Casaubon, Estefanya Charlotte, Veroline Cauberghe, and Dieneke Van de Sompel. 2022. “What Do Families Talk about? Reciprocal Influence towards pro-Environmental Behaviours and Concern in the Household.” In ECREA 2022, Electronic Book of Abstracts, 400–400. Prague: CZECH-IN.
Vancouver
1.
Vazquez Casaubon EC, Cauberghe V, Van de Sompel D. What do families talk about? Reciprocal influence towards pro-environmental behaviours and concern in the household. In: ECREA 2022, Electronic Book of Abstracts. Prague: CZECH-IN; 2022. p. 400–400.
IEEE
[1]
E. C. Vazquez Casaubon, V. Cauberghe, and D. Van de Sompel, “What do families talk about? Reciprocal influence towards pro-environmental behaviours and concern in the household,” in ECREA 2022, Electronic Book of Abstracts, Aarhus, Denmark, 2022, pp. 400–400.
@inproceedings{01GQ7R8ZG31DJW7Z8STDMBYE2C,
  abstract     = {{It is considered that the effort to reduce the anthropogenic impact should be not solely an 
individual effort but requires collective action, including efforts within the household dialogue. 
Evidence reveals that individual efficacy to adopt pro-environmental behaviours depends 
strongly on the household dynamics to achieve the expected goal. On top of it, collective action 
is important to achieve difficult goals (such as conservation behaviours). Additionally, 
household members (parents and children) strongly influence the behaviours of each other (e.g.,
reversed socialization). Therefore, the household dynamics can have an impact on the adoption 
of pro-environmental behaviours. As such, this study focuses on understanding which factors 
stimulate the communication at the household level, among parents and children, about climate 
change. 
Via an online survey, 714 Belgian parents (of children between 8-18 years old) selfreported on the frequency of the communication about environmental protection and risks
within their household (including various topics, depth of conversation, valence, among other 
components of the communication), their acceptance of reversed socialization (childrens’ 
influence on parents), and personal factors (e.g., coping mechanisms towards climate change, 
pro-environmental behaviours). The results reveal that the communication about the 
environment within the household was moderately frequent (M = 3.06, SD = 0.76). After 
performing an exploratory factor analysis (PCA), four different topics of communication were 
identified; sustainable household practices (M = 3.65, SD = 0.86) and parental instructing 
towards sustainable behavior (M = 3.31, SD = 0.90) were the most frequent followed by schoolrelated (M = 2.98, SD = 0.94) and outer influence topics (M = 2.75, SD = 0.87). 
A step-wise regression revealed that the overall communication frequency in the household 
was associated with acceptance of reversed socialization along with children frequently 
initiating the communication. Moreover, step-wise regressions for each topic were performed to 
understand more in depth the predictors associated respectively. Conversations related to 
sustainable household practices were associated with positive communication, and positive 
parental reaction (i.e. when the kids show environmental concern); while parental instructing 
was associated with parent’s perceptions to be able to include the children in the conversation. 
Both topics were also associated with higher reported pro-environmental behaviours of the 
parent, the parents being the conversation initiator; yet, the communication frequency decreased 
when meaning-making was the parent’s dominant coping mechanism (i.e., dealing with their 
concerns related to sustainability with positive feelings such as hope and trust on the 
competence of others to solve the problem). Furthermore, household communication related to 
sustainability was more frequently related to school, when environmental concern displayed 
from the school was higher, and when parents reported to apply a problem-solving coping 
mechanism . The outer influence communication was particularly associated with higher moral 
obligation of the parents to conduct sustainable behavior. Finally, for the late two topics, 
common predictors were the acceptance of reversed socialization and higher frequency of the 
child initiating the conversation. The study brings to light the impact of parents’ acceptance of 
reversed socialization and their environmental coping mechanisms to stimulate communication 
about environmental protection and risks.}},
  articleno    = {{PP 367}},
  author       = {{Vazquez Casaubon, Estefanya Charlotte and Cauberghe, Veroline and Van de Sompel, Dieneke}},
  booktitle    = {{ECREA 2022, Electronic Book of Abstracts}},
  isbn         = {{9788090836426}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  location     = {{Aarhus, Denmark}},
  pages        = {{PP 367:400--PP 367:400}},
  publisher    = {{CZECH-IN}},
  title        = {{What do families talk about? Reciprocal influence towards pro-environmental behaviours and concern in the household}},
  url          = {{https://conferences.au.dk/fileadmin/conferences/2022/ECREA/ECREA_2022_-_Abstract_Book.pdf}},
  year         = {{2022}},
}