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Kinematic analysis of scapulothoracic movements in the shoulder girdle : a whole cadaver study

(2023) JSES INTERNATIONAL. 7(1). p.147-152
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Abstract
Background: Existing kinematic studies of the shoulder girdle focus on humerothoracic movements. Isolated scapulothoracic movements are also performed during daily activities and rehabilitation but kinematic values are lacking. Methods: A kinematic analysis was performed in 14 cadaveric shoulders during protraction, retraction, and shrug. An optical navigation system was used to analyze sternoclavicular, scapulothoracic, and acromioclavicular motions. Results: In the sternoclavicular joint, shrug and retraction caused a posterior clavicular rotation of 5° (standard deviation [SD] 6°) and 3° (SD 2°), while protraction induced an anterior rotation of 3° (SD 2°). Shrug caused a large clavicular elevation of 25° (SD 5°). Shrug and retraction caused an increase in retraction of 17° (SD 5°) and 9° (SD 2°). Protraction induced an increase of 10° (SD 2°) toward protraction. In the scapulothoracic joint, shrug induced an increase of 3° (SD 2°) in anterior scapular tilt, and a lateral rotation of 26° (SD 4°). Retraction caused a lateral rotation of 4° (SD 3°). Protraction caused an increase of 7° (SD 2°) in the scapular protraction position, while shrug and retraction demonstrated a decrease of 9° (SD 2°) and 6° (SD 5°). In the acromioclavicular joint, posterior tilting of the scapula compared to the clavicle increased 23° (SD 6°) during shrug, while during protraction an increase of only 4° (SD 3°) was seen. During shrug, relative lateral rotation increased 13° (SD 4°). The protraction movement decreased the relative protraction position with 3° (SD 2°). Conclusion: This study provided normative kinematic values of scapulothoracic movements in the shoulder girdle.
Keywords
cromioclavicular joint, Biomechanics, Cadaver study, Kinematic analysis, Motion capture, Scapulothoracic joint, Shoulder girdle, Sternoclavicular joint

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MLA
Peeters, Ian, et al. “Kinematic Analysis of Scapulothoracic Movements in the Shoulder Girdle : A Whole Cadaver Study.” JSES INTERNATIONAL, vol. 7, no. 1, 2023, pp. 147–52, doi:10.1016/j.jseint.2022.09.014.
APA
Peeters, I., Braeckevelt, T., Palmans, T., Van Tongel, A., & De Wilde, L. (2023). Kinematic analysis of scapulothoracic movements in the shoulder girdle : a whole cadaver study. JSES INTERNATIONAL, 7(1), 147–152. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jseint.2022.09.014
Chicago author-date
Peeters, Ian, Thomas Braeckevelt, Tanneke Palmans, Alexander Van Tongel, and Lieven De Wilde. 2023. “Kinematic Analysis of Scapulothoracic Movements in the Shoulder Girdle : A Whole Cadaver Study.” JSES INTERNATIONAL 7 (1): 147–52. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jseint.2022.09.014.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Peeters, Ian, Thomas Braeckevelt, Tanneke Palmans, Alexander Van Tongel, and Lieven De Wilde. 2023. “Kinematic Analysis of Scapulothoracic Movements in the Shoulder Girdle : A Whole Cadaver Study.” JSES INTERNATIONAL 7 (1): 147–152. doi:10.1016/j.jseint.2022.09.014.
Vancouver
1.
Peeters I, Braeckevelt T, Palmans T, Van Tongel A, De Wilde L. Kinematic analysis of scapulothoracic movements in the shoulder girdle : a whole cadaver study. JSES INTERNATIONAL. 2023;7(1):147–52.
IEEE
[1]
I. Peeters, T. Braeckevelt, T. Palmans, A. Van Tongel, and L. De Wilde, “Kinematic analysis of scapulothoracic movements in the shoulder girdle : a whole cadaver study,” JSES INTERNATIONAL, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 147–152, 2023.
@article{01GM8BFQ35H17GZZ45F6A8HRCY,
  abstract     = {{Background: Existing kinematic studies of the shoulder girdle focus on humerothoracic movements. Isolated scapulothoracic movements are also performed during daily activities and rehabilitation but kinematic values are lacking.
Methods: A kinematic analysis was performed in 14 cadaveric shoulders during protraction, retraction, and shrug. An optical navigation system was used to analyze sternoclavicular, scapulothoracic, and acromioclavicular motions.
Results: In the sternoclavicular joint, shrug and retraction caused a posterior clavicular rotation of 5° (standard deviation [SD] 6°) and 3° (SD 2°), while protraction induced an anterior rotation of 3° (SD 2°). Shrug caused a large clavicular elevation of 25° (SD 5°). Shrug and retraction caused an increase in retraction of 17° (SD 5°) and 9° (SD 2°). Protraction induced an increase of 10° (SD 2°) toward protraction. In the scapulothoracic joint, shrug induced an increase of 3° (SD 2°) in anterior scapular tilt, and a lateral rotation of 26° (SD 4°). Retraction caused a lateral rotation of 4° (SD 3°). Protraction caused an increase of 7° (SD 2°) in the scapular protraction position, while shrug and retraction demonstrated a decrease of 9° (SD 2°) and 6° (SD 5°). In the acromioclavicular joint, posterior tilting of the scapula compared to the clavicle increased 23° (SD 6°) during shrug, while during protraction an increase of only 4° (SD 3°) was seen. During shrug, relative lateral rotation increased 13° (SD 4°). The protraction movement decreased the relative protraction position with 3° (SD 2°).
Conclusion: This study provided normative kinematic values of scapulothoracic movements in the shoulder girdle.}},
  author       = {{Peeters, Ian and Braeckevelt, Thomas and Palmans, Tanneke and Van Tongel, Alexander and De Wilde, Lieven}},
  issn         = {{2666-6383}},
  journal      = {{JSES INTERNATIONAL}},
  keywords     = {{cromioclavicular joint,Biomechanics,Cadaver study,Kinematic analysis,Motion capture,Scapulothoracic joint,Shoulder girdle,Sternoclavicular joint}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{1}},
  pages        = {{147--152}},
  title        = {{Kinematic analysis of scapulothoracic movements in the shoulder girdle : a whole cadaver study}},
  url          = {{http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jseint.2022.09.014}},
  volume       = {{7}},
  year         = {{2023}},
}

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