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Exploring the nexus between transitional justice and ecoterritorial conflict resolution : time for an ecoterritorial turn in transformative transitional justice?

Sarah Kerremans (UGent) and Tine Destrooper (UGent)
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Abstract
This article explores the nexus between ecoterritorial conflict resolution and transformative transitional justice, against the background of (neo)extractivism and the Peruvian case of half a century of oil violence. Our argument is twofold. On the one hand, we argue that transitional justice can act as a conceptual and analytical lens to better understand and further (claims for) change while also countering the invisibilization of ecoterritorial struggles of Indigenous and local communities who resist the framing of their lives and ecosystems as sacrificable or disposable. On the other hand, we argue that reading ecoterritorial struggles through the lens of transitional justice also has implications for the paradigm itself. The article is rooted in the first author's longstanding work with Indigenous communities in the Peruvian Amazon who engage with transitional justice discourses and practices as part of their struggle against oil violence.
Keywords
HRC, Transitional Justice, Human Rights Law, Indigenous People's rights, Ecoterritorial conflict, Indigenous peoples, (neo)extractivism, transformative transitional justice, COLONIALITY, RIGHTS, POWER

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MLA
Kerremans, Sarah, and Tine Destrooper. “Exploring the Nexus between Transitional Justice and Ecoterritorial Conflict Resolution : Time for an Ecoterritorial Turn in Transformative Transitional Justice?” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE, vol. 17, no. 1, 2023, pp. 54–70, doi:10.1093/ijtj/ijac026.
APA
Kerremans, S., & Destrooper, T. (2023). Exploring the nexus between transitional justice and ecoterritorial conflict resolution : time for an ecoterritorial turn in transformative transitional justice? INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE, 17(1), 54–70. https://doi.org/10.1093/ijtj/ijac026
Chicago author-date
Kerremans, Sarah, and Tine Destrooper. 2023. “Exploring the Nexus between Transitional Justice and Ecoterritorial Conflict Resolution : Time for an Ecoterritorial Turn in Transformative Transitional Justice?” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE 17 (1): 54–70. https://doi.org/10.1093/ijtj/ijac026.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Kerremans, Sarah, and Tine Destrooper. 2023. “Exploring the Nexus between Transitional Justice and Ecoterritorial Conflict Resolution : Time for an Ecoterritorial Turn in Transformative Transitional Justice?” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE 17 (1): 54–70. doi:10.1093/ijtj/ijac026.
Vancouver
1.
Kerremans S, Destrooper T. Exploring the nexus between transitional justice and ecoterritorial conflict resolution : time for an ecoterritorial turn in transformative transitional justice? INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE. 2023;17(1):54–70.
IEEE
[1]
S. Kerremans and T. Destrooper, “Exploring the nexus between transitional justice and ecoterritorial conflict resolution : time for an ecoterritorial turn in transformative transitional justice?,” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 54–70, 2023.
@article{01GKV60BX992G5TPK6JWX85V08,
  abstract     = {{This article explores the nexus between ecoterritorial conflict resolution and transformative transitional justice, against the background of (neo)extractivism and the Peruvian case of half a century of oil violence. Our argument is twofold. On the one hand, we argue that transitional justice can act as a conceptual and analytical lens to better understand and further (claims for) change while also countering the invisibilization of ecoterritorial struggles of Indigenous and local communities who resist the framing of their lives and ecosystems as sacrificable or disposable. On the other hand, we argue that reading ecoterritorial struggles through the lens of transitional justice also has implications for the paradigm itself. The article is rooted in the first author's longstanding work with Indigenous communities in the Peruvian Amazon who engage with transitional justice discourses and practices as part of their struggle against oil violence.}},
  author       = {{Kerremans, Sarah and Destrooper, Tine}},
  issn         = {{1752-7716}},
  journal      = {{INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE}},
  keywords     = {{HRC,Transitional Justice,Human Rights Law,Indigenous People's rights,Ecoterritorial conflict,Indigenous peoples,(neo)extractivism,transformative transitional justice,COLONIALITY,RIGHTS,POWER}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{1}},
  pages        = {{54--70}},
  title        = {{Exploring the nexus between transitional justice and ecoterritorial conflict resolution : time for an ecoterritorial turn in transformative transitional justice?}},
  url          = {{http://doi.org/10.1093/ijtj/ijac026}},
  volume       = {{17}},
  year         = {{2023}},
}

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